December is a quiet month around here, since the semester is coming to a close and many people are busy preparing for the holidays. If you’re looking for a unique present though, why not sign up for our photography workshop with Justin Wonnacott this Saturday?
More details here and you can email fiona.wright@carleton.ca to register.
Image: Justin Wonnacott, A milkfish and four female capelin, from I Remember and I Forget, 2007-2010. Inkjet print.
ZoomInfo
Camera
Canon EOS 30D
ISO
800
Aperture
f/11
Exposure
1/250th
Focal Length
73mm

December is a quiet month around here, since the semester is coming to a close and many people are busy preparing for the holidays. If you’re looking for a unique present though, why not sign up for our photography workshop with Justin Wonnacott this Saturday?

More details here and you can email fiona.wright@carleton.ca to register.

Image: Justin Wonnacott, A milkfish and four female capelin, from I Remember and I Forget, 2007-2010. Inkjet print.

6photography, justin wonnacott,

On View: Carleton Curatorial Lab: The Nature of Beasts in 17th-century Prints
Francis Place (1647-1728) after Francis Barlow. Pierce Tempest (1653-1717), publisher. A Tawny Owl defending her Young (1694). Etching from a alater edition of Multae et diversae avium species. Private collection.
This print appears to be inspired by “The Eagle and the Owl,” a fable written in the style of Aesop by Jean de La Fontaine and published in his first collection of Fables Choisies (1668). While La Fontaine’s fables were only illustrated with small woodcuts that anthropomorphized the beasts. Barlow’s print is thought to be the earliest and most naturalistic rendering.
The fable tells of an eagle who agrees not to eat the mother owl’s young if she can describe them accurately. Unfortunately, the proud mother owl embellishes the physical description of her owlets, and when she is away hunting during the night, they are snatched by the eagle, who later claims not to have recognized them based on her description. The moral warns against self-flattery:
Thinking your like the loveliest of all/You told the eagle of your young ones’ graces; You gave the picture of their faces: - Had it of likeness any traces?
ZoomInfo
Camera
Canon EOS 30D
ISO
400
Aperture
f/7.1
Exposure
1/80th
Focal Length
77mm

On View: Carleton Curatorial Lab: The Nature of Beasts in 17th-century Prints

Francis Place (1647-1728) after Francis Barlow. Pierce Tempest (1653-1717), publisher. A Tawny Owl defending her Young (1694). Etching from a alater edition of Multae et diversae avium species. Private collection.

This print appears to be inspired by “The Eagle and the Owl,” a fable written in the style of Aesop by Jean de La Fontaine and published in his first collection of Fables Choisies (1668). While La Fontaine’s fables were only illustrated with small woodcuts that anthropomorphized the beasts. Barlow’s print is thought to be the earliest and most naturalistic rendering.

The fable tells of an eagle who agrees not to eat the mother owl’s young if she can describe them accurately. Unfortunately, the proud mother owl embellishes the physical description of her owlets, and when she is away hunting during the night, they are snatched by the eagle, who later claims not to have recognized them based on her description. The moral warns against self-flattery:

Thinking your like the loveliest of all/You told the eagle of your young ones’ graces; You gave the picture of their faces: - Had it of likeness any traces?

6campus curatorial lab, prints, aesop's fables,

Collection Friday!
Rita Letendre, Burning Light, 1969. Silkscreen on paper. 
Happy Hanukkah!
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Camera
Canon EOS 5D Mark II
ISO
200
Aperture
f/9
Exposure
1/2th
Focal Length
100mm

Collection Friday!

Rita Letendre, Burning Light, 1969. Silkscreen on paper.

Happy Hanukkah!

6collection, hanukkah, menorah, rita letendre, printmaking, medium,

Ottawa Art Scene: November 28 - December 4

Tonight, art historian Amelia Jones will be delivering the Shirley Thomson Memorial Lecture at the University of Ottawa. Her lecture will be on "Performance and "Relationality" in the 1970s: Chris Burden and the Conceptual Body." This is a great opportunity to hear from one of the field’s most renowned scholars - do not miss this!

BUT: if you’re not in the mood for a lecture (it is the end of the semester), you can show off your art history and pop culture knowledge at the Carleton Art History Undergraduate Society trivia night! Head to the James St. Pub basement with your smartest and art-iest friends for a really fun night (including the chance to win some great prizes from CUAG, I might add).

On Friday night, Ottawa’s newest gallery, Central Art Garage, presents the new exhibition Paper Pusher, a group show of Ottawa artists’ works on paper. Go check out the cool new space, and support local artists who “push the boundaries” of the medium.

And we can’t forget SAW Gallery’s annual fundraiser SKETCH, where  you can pick up great works of art for affordable prices. All proceeds of the sales will go toward Galerie SAW Gallery’s programming activities and future expansion into our new spaces at Arts Court in 2015.

On Sunday, the Holiday edition of Idle Hands Art, Craft and Vintage Sale is happening at St. Anthony’s Hall. Tons of amazing local and regional vendors, including Top Shelf Preserves, N-Product Inc., and Twiss & Weber. Get started on your holiday shopping, or get ideas for your own projects!

Tuesday night is the December edition of CUAG’s DOUBLE MAJOR lecture series. We unite journalist Mark Sutcliffe and Carleton professor Sam Dube for talks on running and epigenetics.

Lots to do! Have a good week everyone.

6ottarts,

The December edition of DOUBLE MAJOR is going to be a good one!

Tuesday, 3 December, 2013 at 7pm

Running (Mark Sutcliffe) and Epigenetics (Sam Dube)

Here’s some info about the speakers…

Mark Sutcliffe is an Ottawa writer, broadcaster, entrepreneur, and volunteer. He hosts a daily talk show on 580 CFRA and appears regularly on Rogers TV and CPAC. He writes two columns a week in the Ottawa Citizen. And he’s also the CEO of Great River Media, whose products include the Ottawa Business Journal and iRun magazine, Canada’s highest-circulation running magazine. Mark is on the board of directors of the Ottawa Chamber of Commerce, Invest Ottawa, Algonquin College, and Ottawa Race Weekend. Mark started running for exercise in 1998 and ran his first marathon in 2004. He’s now training for his 19th marathon and has raised more than $100,000 for health research through his running.

Sam Dubé is a Professor of Mathematics at Carleton University, where he attained all three of his degrees. He has been involved with Carleton Shad Valley, a summer camp that focuses on sciences, engineering, technology, and entrepreneurship, as the Faculty of Science representative for the past thirteen years.  He also has a background in mixed-martial arts and has trained and competed in Olympic-lifting and powerlifting competitions.

More info about the event here.

6double major,

Now on View: Laura Letinsky: Still Life Photographs, 1997-2012
Duncan Wooldridge on Laura Letinsky’s ambiguity about gravity:
"Many of the works from Fall describe weight and gravity, yet they depict a virtual, potential weight and a gravity that is for the moment at least, outside of our visual perception. These forces are anticipated, expectant.  The plastic cup, which we know to be light enough to be swept away in a breeze, feels uneasily solid when isolated, seen only with its shadow (which here, as in the language of the advertising photograph, describes presence). The shadow catches the lip between table and wall: the seeming weight of the cup making all the stronger the sense of a fall that is about to occur.  We imagine gravity taking hold.
As viewers, our interpretations of images are usually narrative, our readings causal – a list produces a tilt, produces a fall.  Letinsky is intensely aware of how the viewer perceives and reads the image.  And because weight constructs a narrative and sets in motion a series of forces, she can also remove this weight; removing narrative at a stroke. Anticipating and short-circuiting the projection of our viewing, in Ill Form and Void Full Letinsky attempts a kind of weightlessness, one that is the production of a suspended looking.
[…]
As our eyes scan the surface of the image, flatness is rendered increasingly uncanny, magical perhaps. Italo Calvino in his writing proposed a similar quality for literature, remarking “whenever humanity seems condemned to heaviness, I think I should fly like Perseus into a difference space.  I don’t mean escaping into dreams or into the irrational.  I mean that I have to change my approach, look at the world from a different perspective, with a different logic and within fresh methods of cognition and verification. The images of lightness that I seek should not fade away like dreams dissolved by the realities of present and future.” As we cannot fully reconstruct the spaces from which these images are drawn, we are placed in a state of suspension, a pictorial space outside of regular temporality: a lightness that is akin to flight, that is awash with different perceptions.”
(Source)
Image: Laura Letinsky, Untitled #12, 2010. From the series Ill Form & Void Full. Inkjet print. Courtesy of the artist and Yancey Richardson Gallery, New York.
ZoomInfo
Camera
REALVIEW 3 1 0 1 ScanMate 4000
ISO
Aperture
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Focal Length

Now on View: Laura Letinsky: Still Life Photographs, 1997-2012

Duncan Wooldridge on Laura Letinsky’s ambiguity about gravity:

"Many of the works from Fall describe weight and gravity, yet they depict a virtual, potential weight and a gravity that is for the moment at least, outside of our visual perception. These forces are anticipated, expectant.  The plastic cup, which we know to be light enough to be swept away in a breeze, feels uneasily solid when isolated, seen only with its shadow (which here, as in the language of the advertising photograph, describes presence). The shadow catches the lip between table and wall: the seeming weight of the cup making all the stronger the sense of a fall that is about to occur.  We imagine gravity taking hold.

As viewers, our interpretations of images are usually narrative, our readings causal – a list produces a tilt, produces a fall.  Letinsky is intensely aware of how the viewer perceives and reads the image.  And because weight constructs a narrative and sets in motion a series of forces, she can also remove this weight; removing narrative at a stroke. Anticipating and short-circuiting the projection of our viewing, in Ill Form and Void Full Letinsky attempts a kind of weightlessness, one that is the production of a suspended looking.

[…]

As our eyes scan the surface of the image, flatness is rendered increasingly uncanny, magical perhaps. Italo Calvino in his writing proposed a similar quality for literature, remarking “whenever humanity seems condemned to heaviness, I think I should fly like Perseus into a difference space.  I don’t mean escaping into dreams or into the irrational.  I mean that I have to change my approach, look at the world from a different perspective, with a different logic and within fresh methods of cognition and verification. The images of lightness that I seek should not fade away like dreams dissolved by the realities of present and future.” As we cannot fully reconstruct the spaces from which these images are drawn, we are placed in a state of suspension, a pictorial space outside of regular temporality: a lightness that is akin to flight, that is awash with different perceptions.”

(Source)

Image: Laura Letinsky, Untitled #12, 2010. From the series Ill Form & Void Full. Inkjet print. Courtesy of the artist and Yancey Richardson Gallery, New York.

6Laura Letinsky, photography, current exhibitions,

Collection Friday!
James Barcoman, Sophie, from the portfolio Untitled, 1977. Gelatin silver print on paper.
ZoomInfo
Camera
Canon EOS 30D
ISO
320
Aperture
f/8
Exposure
1/25th
Focal Length
102mm

Collection Friday!

James Barcoman, Sophie, from the portfolio Untitled, 1977. Gelatin silver print on paper.

6collection friday, collection, photography, james barcoman, medium,

Ottawa Art Scene: November 21 - 17

Tonight, the Bytown Museum is throwing a Movember fundraiser called “The Bytown Mo-down" as part of their exhibition "Great Mo-Ments in Bytown", which features archival photos of epic moustaches from Ottawa’s past. The event tonight will include Kitchessipi beer, Spins and Needles activities, and prizes for best moustache (hopefully fake ones count!). (Thursday)

Speaking of Spins and Needles, the next Nature Nocturne on Friday night is craft-themed! “Built It" features DJ sounds, workshops, art installations and a holiday market (as you know, I love a good craft market) with items from local and independent makers and businesses (including Victoire!). Artengine is also involved in creating the setting for the night. Get your tickets ASAP if you haven’t already.

After the weekend, there are still plenty of artsy events happening. For the next edition of the Wednesday Morning Lecture Series, Louise Dery, the Director of Galerie UQAM, will talk about Painting in Canada Now.” Info about upcoming lectures can be found here.

Are you an artist? Are you part of the Carleton community as a student, alumni, faculty, staff, or retiree? Then submit your artwork for our Carleton Community Art Exhibition! 

You can submit up to TWO art works. All the details (along with the entry form and FAQ) can be found here.

Please share widely!!! We want to see this gallery OVERFLOWING with YOUR art! :)

6student collaborations, carleton community art exhibition, medium,

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