Upcoming Event at CUAG: DOUBLE MAJOR// March Edition: Slow Goods and Metaethical Aesthetics

Tuesday, 11 March, 2014, 7 p.m.

This month (second last of the season!!) will feature N-product co-founder Dominic Coballe on the “Slow Goods” movement and Carleton Philosophy professor Dr. Gordon Davis on “metaethical aesthetics”.

Join Carleton University Art Gallery (CUAG) for the seventh installment of our lecture series DOUBLE MAJOR, where we’ll hear from two passionate experts, each speaking for 20 minutes about their subject, after which there will be a Q&A addressing both topics. One speaker is from the Ottawa-Gatineau community, and one is from the Carleton community. DOUBLE MAJOR is a fun and friendly way to stimulate discussion of seemingly disparate topics, and to make new connections between people and ideas. Props encouraged!

Slow Goods (Dominic Coballe) and Metaethical Aesthetics (Gordon Davis)

DOUBLE MAJOR is held at CUAG. Lectures start at 7pm.

DOUBLE MAJOR is brought to you by Carleton University Art Gallery and the Carleton University Alumni Association.

Speakers:

Dominic Coballe: After a brief dalliance with physical therapy studies, Dominic is now in a committed 14 year relationship with design, the maker movement and entrepreneurship. He is the co-founder of the Ottawa-based design company N-product and a practitioner of the Slow Goods movement, where objects take time to craft and are made of quality materials. He was born in Vietnam, lived in India and is now firmly rooted in Ottawa, Canada with his partner and their two boys.

Gordon Davis studied philosophy at McGill, University of Toronto and the University of Oxford, where he finished his doctorate in 2005. His work addresses the history of ethical theory in both Western and Eastern traditions, as well as various issues in contemporary ethics and political philosophy, and tackles meta-ethical questions such as the viability of moral relativism and related analyses of moral discourse. He is currently the Chair of the Department of Philosophy at Carleton University.

For the winter program, please visit: http://cuag.carleton.ca/
index.php/exhibitions/doublemajor/
Discount parking passes ($4.00 flat rate) will be available for sale. See the “visiting” page of CUAG’s website for details.

6Double Major, Carleton University,

On View at CUAG: Dennis Tourbin, La Crise d’Octobre: Chronology, 1990.

"In 1990, Tourbin began to focus his attention on the October Crisis, beginning at the National Library and Archives with a comprehensive search of Canadian newspaper coverage of the event. From this research, Tourbin culled and combined fragments of text and images to establish a visual chronology of the events.

With the distance of two decades, Tourbin systematically explored the visual language that emerged from the media’s portrayal of these events.” - Marcie Bronson, curator of Dennis Tourbin: The Language of Visual Poetry.

Here are some interesting links ff you’re interested in learning more about the October Crisis, especially how it was portrayed in the media during the time, and it’s legacy in Canada.

CBC News Archives

NFB film “Action: The October Crisis of 1970” (1973, Robin Spry, dir.)

"The October Crisis, 40 Years Later" (Globe and Mail article by Moira Dann)

Image: Screen shot of the FLQ Manifesto read on-air in Montreal on Radio-Canada.

6October Crisis, FLQ, CBC, Dennis Tourbin, Current exhibitions, medium,

Collection Friday!
John Scott, Untitled, 1997.
Latex/acrylic on paper.
ZoomInfo
Camera
Canon EOS 5D Mark II
ISO
200
Aperture
f/9
Exposure
1/2th
Focal Length
100mm

Collection Friday!

John Scott, Untitled, 1997.

Latex/acrylic on paper.

6collection friday, collection, medium, john scott,

Ottawa Art Scene: February 27 - March 5

It’s looking like a busy week here at CUAG…we’ve got THREE events coming up! There’s lots of other great art stuff happening around the city too.

Tonight, head to the National Gallery of Canada for a drawing workshop in their new John Ruskin exhibition space. For inspiration, Check out this article in their magazine on the British artist’s watercolours.

Tomorrow (Friday) evening, come to CUAG for an Art Picnic, where we’ll be serving up spoken word, acoustic performances, a zine exchange (plus all the materials to make your own), and button-making! All the activities are inspired by our winter exhibitions, so you can walk around and check out the art as well! Don’t forget to bring something for the potluck!

On Saturday, if you’re in the mood to make some art, the Ottawa Art Gallery has organized an embroidery workshop in conjunction with David R. Harper’s exhibition. Canadian artist Kate Jackson will be leading the workshop, talking about her own practice and demonstrating how to draw with embroidery! Looks fantastic, plus it’s free! Registration is required.

On Monday evening, we’re thrilled to be presenting a panel discussion about the life, work, and legacy of artist, activist, and poet Dennis Tourbin. Diana Nemiroff will be moderating the conversation between journalism professor Christopher Dornan, curator/art historian Judith Parker, and artist/curator Daniel Sharp.

Finally, on Wednesday afternoon, CUAG is hosting a lecture by renowned Concordia Art History professor Cynthia Hammond, who will be speaking on “Making Space: Activism, Landscape, and Women’s History”. Join us at 4 p.m. if you’re on campus!

6ottarts,

Upcoming Event at CUAG: Panel Discussion on Dennis Tourbin’s Work: Dornan / Nemiroff / Parker / Sharp 
In conjunction with the current exhibition “Dennis Tourbin: The Language of Visual Poetry,” CUAG invites you to join in an informal conversation about the work of the late, great Dennis Tourbin, a beloved and influential artist in Ottawa. Each panelist — Christopher Dornan, Judith Parker, and Daniel Sharp — will consider aspects of Tourbin’s work from their unique perspective. The discussion will be moderated by Diana Nemiroff.
Christopher Dornan teaches in the School of Journalism and Communications at Carleton University, and has worked as a reporter, columnist, editor, and critic. The independent curator and art historian Judith Parker has researched Tourbin’s work extensively, and curated Freedom of Association: Dennis Tourbin and Other Artists at the Ottawa Art Gallery (2012). Daniel Sharp is an Ottawa-based artist and curator who has worked as a program officer and curator of the art collection in the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada. The independent curator and art historian Diana Nemiroff acquired Tourbin’s work La Crise d’Octobre / Chronology (1990) for the National Gallery’s collection. Nemiroff and Parker are both contributing texts to the forthcoming exhibition catalogue.
Dennis Tourbin (1946-1998) was a poet, painter, performance artist, novelist, poetry-magazine publisher, and arts activist. Tourbin’s visual art includes his trademark vividly coloured “painted poems” in acrylic and watercolour, as well as black ink drawings and silkscreen prints. His most well-known paintings, made in the 1990s, address the October Crisis of 1970 — a topic Tourbin explored intermittently from 1970 to 1997. Tourbin’s written works include rubberstamp-printed, handwritten and stencilled poems, diary/chronicles, and novels. In other media he produced “talking books,” audio tapes, videos, and multi-media performances that he called “painted plays.” From the 1970s onwards, Tourbin played a key role in the development of lively regional art scenes in St. Catharines, Peterborough. and Ottawa.
Dennis Tourbin: The Language of Visual Poetry is curated by Marcie Bronson, and organized and circulated by Rodman Hall Art Centre / Brock University.
Location and Parking: CUAG is located at the north end of the Carleton campus, in the St. Patrick’s building.
For our location and parking, see: http://cuag.carleton.ca/index.php/visiting/directions/
Parking passes ($4.00 flat rate) will be sold by CUAG staff just prior to the event. They will be standing inside the tunnel entrance, accessible from the roundabout near Leeds House residence.
ZoomInfo
Camera
Canon EOS 5D Mark II
ISO
200
Aperture
f/8
Exposure
1/125th
Focal Length
70mm

Upcoming Event at CUAG: Panel Discussion on Dennis Tourbin’s Work: Dornan / Nemiroff / Parker / Sharp

In conjunction with the current exhibition “Dennis Tourbin: The Language of Visual Poetry,” CUAG invites you to join in an informal conversation about the work of the late, great Dennis Tourbin, a beloved and influential artist in Ottawa. Each panelist — Christopher Dornan, Judith Parker, and Daniel Sharp — will consider aspects of Tourbin’s work from their unique perspective. The discussion will be moderated by Diana Nemiroff.

Christopher Dornan teaches in the School of Journalism and Communications at Carleton University, and has worked as a reporter, columnist, editor, and critic. The independent curator and art historian Judith Parker has researched Tourbin’s work extensively, and curated Freedom of Association: Dennis Tourbin and Other Artists at the Ottawa Art Gallery (2012). Daniel Sharp is an Ottawa-based artist and curator who has worked as a program officer and curator of the art collection in the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada. The independent curator and art historian Diana Nemiroff acquired Tourbin’s work La Crise d’Octobre / Chronology (1990) for the National Gallery’s collection. Nemiroff and Parker are both contributing texts to the forthcoming exhibition catalogue.

Dennis Tourbin (1946-1998) was a poet, painter, performance artist, novelist, poetry-magazine publisher, and arts activist. Tourbin’s visual art includes his trademark vividly coloured “painted poems” in acrylic and watercolour, as well as black ink drawings and silkscreen prints. His most well-known paintings, made in the 1990s, address the October Crisis of 1970 — a topic Tourbin explored intermittently from 1970 to 1997. Tourbin’s written works include rubberstamp-printed, handwritten and stencilled poems, diary/chronicles, and novels. In other media he produced “talking books,” audio tapes, videos, and multi-media performances that he called “painted plays.” From the 1970s onwards, Tourbin played a key role in the development of lively regional art scenes in St. Catharines, Peterborough. and Ottawa.

Dennis Tourbin: The Language of Visual Poetry is curated by Marcie Bronson, and organized and circulated by Rodman Hall Art Centre / Brock University.

Location and Parking:
CUAG is located at the north end of the Carleton campus, in the St. Patrick’s building.

For our location and parking, see: http://cuag.carleton.ca/index.php/visiting/directions/

Parking passes ($4.00 flat rate) will be sold by CUAG staff just prior to the event. They will be standing inside the tunnel entrance, accessible from the roundabout near Leeds House residence.

6medium, Dennis Tourbin,

On view: Andrea Geyer & Sharon Hayes, In Times Like These, Only Criminals Remain Silent, 2005. 5 double-sided posters, newsprint for distribution.

This collaborative work was produced for the exhibition Patriot at the Contemporary Art Museum Baltimore in 2005. The five different sheets of probing questions - all but one addressed to “you” - evoke a poll or lengthy questionnaire, but can also be considered as an invitation to conversation.

Here is an excerpt from one of the sheets:

Who are you with? Are you with a group? Why are you here? Who do you speak for? What do you stand for? Can you identify yourself? Where do you live? Have you lived there for more than 2 years? Where do you work? How much money do you make? Can I see your badge? Do you have documentation? Who do you represent? Are you authorized to make decisions? Who is the spokesperson for your group? How will I know who is who? You are authorized to speak on behalf of whom? Who do you report to? Do you have a partner? Why are you by yourself? Are you nervous? Why are you acting suspicious? What do you want? Do you have a permit? Why are you asking me these questions? Are you qualified? Where are your manners? Where are your values? Do you have a goal? And why are you here? Did you read the report? What do you believe in? What do you know? Why then did you stay? Do you know your rights? Are you prepared? Do you understand your responsibility? What are your duties? What are you trying to do? Are you taking a position? Can you take my position? Can you sit here? Are you a witness? Are you a victim? How are you organized? Are you a member of a party? What are you looking for? Who told you to say that? Don’t you think I know my rights? What are your politics? Are you active? Who are you speaking to? Do you think your actions have consequences? Why don’t you turn around? Are you speaking to me? What does it mean to express yourself? Whose interests are you speaking for when you talk? Were you told to represent those interests? Are you an investor? Are you clever? Are you proud? Do you prefer to be around like-minded people? Do you have friends? Do you agree with everyone? Do you talk or do you act? Do  you follow others? Do you take the lead? Why are you upset? Are you complaining? Do you complain regularly? Who do you complain to? Are you considerate in your choices? Do you find it easy to be impartial? Would you call yourself a group? Do see yourself as one, two, or more? Would you call yourself a crowd or an audience?

6sharon hayes, andrea geyer, medium,

(Bonus) Collection Friday!
George Hawken, Hearts and Flowers, 1976.
Intaglio on paper.
ZoomInfo
Camera
Canon EOS 5D Mark II
ISO
200
Aperture
f/9
Exposure
1/2th
Focal Length
100mm

(Bonus) Collection Friday!

George Hawken, Hearts and Flowers, 1976.

Intaglio on paper.

6collection, george hawken, medium,

Collection Friday!
Hugh Mackenzie, Typewriter, 1983.
Soft-ground etching and aquatint on zinc.
Plus a Charles Bukowski type-written poem for Valentine’s Day.
ZoomInfo
Camera
Canon EOS 30D
ISO
400
Aperture
f/5.6
Exposure
1/60th
Focal Length
40mm

Collection Friday!

Hugh Mackenzie, Typewriter, 1983.

Soft-ground etching and aquatint on zinc.

Plus a Charles Bukowski type-written poem for Valentine’s Day.

6collection friday, hugh mackenzie, medium,

Ottawa Art Scene: February 13 - 19

Are you sticking around Ottawa for the long weekend? There are some great artsy events happening in the city - with or without a Valentine.

Tonight, a new exhibition opens at the National Gallery of Canada. The NGC and the National Galleries of Scotland have partnered to present Ruskin: Aritst and Observer which features over 140 water colours, drawings, and daguerreotypes by the influential British art critic. Hopefully all the content from my 19th-century art history class will come streaming back to me after a visit to the show, but if not, the tour by Christopher Newall on Friday at 12:15 p.m. should help.

Also tonight, the very excellent Fall Down Gallery is celebrating their move around the corner (to Somerset) with one last party at the Bank St. location. Expect some good music, good attitude, and if there’s not live painting, then I’ll eat my hat.

On Saturday, a new art gallery/tattoo parlour opens in Hintonberg. Railbender is celebrating with a grand opening party, including treats by Herbivore at the Door and Beyond the Pale (so local), plus tons of great Ottawa artists like Stefan Thompson and Marc Adornato.

If you’re more of a Golden Triangle/Centretown person, there will apparently be art installations and participatory projections at the DOUBLE TROUBLE party (with the Ceremony DJs and DJ Lamb-Rabbit), so put a little art into that night out on Elgin.

There are lots of arts events happening as part of Winterlude, including ice sculptures, “Snow’Art”, and photography at the Museum of Nature.

Have a good long weekend (and Reading Week)!

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