Blair Smith will be at A Very Artsy Halloween TOMORROW NIGHT, polarioid camera in hand, to take your foto! I can’t wait to see everyone’s costumes……

p.s. Here is one of her photo works from her recent SPA:O final grad exhibition. Congrats, Blair!

Source.

6blair smith, halloween, student collaborations,

Curator (and Carleton University post-doctoral fellow) Nathan Fils, on The Eagle and Cat (1696), by Francis Place (1647-1728), after Francis Barlow:
The story that Barlow visited Scotland is supported by an anecdote in Horace Walpole’s Catalogue of Engravers (1786), which accompanies a description of a mortal struggle between an eagle and a wildcat: “This event Barlow saw in Scotland, as he was drawing views there. The cat’s resistance brought both animals to the ground, where Barlow took them up.
The Eagle and Cat is entirely characteristic  of an artist fascinated by fables. Ernes (sea eagles) had been observed to steal lambs in northern Scotland, and the birds feature in Norse and Scottish legends as the bandits of small children.
The tension of hte moment “recorded” by Barlow allows for teh construction of a narrative. he probably told the story of the encounter to customers, while the etching served as a powerful rhetorical device that bore witness to his reputation.
The story and image are likely due to self-mythologizing on Barlow’s part. There were eagles in Barlow’s coat of arms and his London shop was called The Golden Eagle.
This print can be seen in The Nature of Beasts in 17th-century Prints, on now at Carleton University Art Gallery (CUAG) until mid-January.
ZoomInfo
Camera
Canon EOS 30D
ISO
400
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f/6.3
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1/100th
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82mm

Curator (and Carleton University post-doctoral fellow) Nathan Fils, on The Eagle and Cat (1696), by Francis Place (1647-1728), after Francis Barlow:

The story that Barlow visited Scotland is supported by an anecdote in Horace Walpole’s Catalogue of Engravers (1786), which accompanies a description of a mortal struggle between an eagle and a wildcat: “This event Barlow saw in Scotland, as he was drawing views there. The cat’s resistance brought both animals to the ground, where Barlow took them up.

The Eagle and Cat is entirely characteristic  of an artist fascinated by fables. Ernes (sea eagles) had been observed to steal lambs in northern Scotland, and the birds feature in Norse and Scottish legends as the bandits of small children.

The tension of hte moment “recorded” by Barlow allows for teh construction of a narrative. he probably told the story of the encounter to customers, while the etching served as a powerful rhetorical device that bore witness to his reputation.

The story and image are likely due to self-mythologizing on Barlow’s part. There were eagles in Barlow’s coat of arms and his London shop was called The Golden Eagle.

This print can be seen in The Nature of Beasts in 17th-century Prints, on now at Carleton University Art Gallery (CUAG) until mid-January.

6campus curatorial laboratory, current exhibitions, historical prints, cats, badass, medium,

Carleton University Art Gallery (CUAG) presents “Laura Letinsky, Still Life  Photographs, 1997-2012”, on now until 15 January 2014.

Oscillating between flatness and volume, story and metaphor, Letinsky’s still life photographs challenge viewers to keep looking and to ask questions about how we see. For more: http://cuag.carleton.ca/index.php/exhibitions/183/

For more videos, including artist interviews and behind-the-scenes, check out our YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/CUArtGallery?feature=watch

Video produced by Kaylee Chancellor-Maddison. Thanks Kaylee!

6student collaborations, Laura Letinsky, videos,

Collection Friday!
William Ronald, Untitled, 1995. Acrylic on paper.
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Camera
Canon EOS 5D Mark II
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200
Aperture
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Collection Friday!

William Ronald, Untitled, 1995. Acrylic on paper.

6collection friday, collection, william ronald, medium,

Ottawa Art Scene: October 17 - 23

Two new photography exhibitions at the National Gallery of Canada open this weekend. Robert Burley: The Disappearance of Darkness and Michel Campeau: Icons of Obsolescence both address the radical transformation of photography from analog to digital in the twenty-first century. Burley documents camera and film factories in their decline, while Michael Campeau captures what remains of the analog world: darkrooms and their paraphernalia, film cameras, and photography manuals. Even though the shows officially open tomorrow, you might be able to check them out tonight during extended hours.

If you’re a grad student in Carleton’s School for Studies in Arts and Culture, get to the Heart & Crown in the Market tomorrow night at 6pm for the next edition of the Art History Graduate Students Association’s successful Trivia Nights. Bring a couple friends and show off your pop culture knowledge!

Also on Friday night is the official vernissage for La Petite Mort’s newest group show, 24 Cats, about the complex and often contradictory relationship we have with the feline population. Artists from Ottawa, Toronto, Winnipeg, Montreal, and Romania explore this relationship, so go check out this fun show. No real cats in the gallery though, I already asked.

On Wednesday evening, head to the Ottawa Art Gallery for a talk by Rosemarie Tovell, former Curator of Canadian prints and drawings at the National Gallery of Canada. Organized in conjunction with the gallery’s exhibition Sell Out?, Tovell will deliver a talk called Screen Wars: The Group of Seven and the High-Jacking of a New Art Form” to discuss how the Group of Seven and the National Gallery of Canada influenced the beginnings of serigraphy in Canada.

Have a good (and rainy) weekend!

6ottarts,

Special announcement to lift those spirits during Midterms…

Attention all Carleton University students and friends: Celebrate the spooky season at Carleton University Art Gallery with art projects, dancing, and food at our first ever A Very Artsy Halloween party!

Local band Organ Eyes and DJs Rococo, Musicc, and Rocky LaLune will provide the night’s music while you dance, watch old-school silent horror films, and make Halloween masks. All materials are provided, along with pizza, popcorn, and candy.

In a special partnership with Kira Daily of CAHUS, we’ll be creating light graffiti on the walls of the gallery. Ottawa-based artist Blair Smith will also be in the gallery with a Polaroid photo booth to make personalized Tarot cards. Look out for other artist-run activities throughout the night as well.

Prizes will be given out for the best art-inspired costume, so come as your best Salvador Dali or Edvard Munch’s The Scream.

Doors open at 9 p.m and party goes until 1 a.m. Admission is free and everyone is welcome!

Organized in collaboration with Carleton Art History Undergraduate Society (CAHUS), Visual Arts Club Carleton, and Artengine.

Carleton University Art Gallery (CUAG) is located in the St. Patrick’s Building on campus.

6student collaborations, halloween, medium,

In Coaptation (2012), Young & Giroux combine the curtain wall with a racking system, as the main structural feature.
As Christian Giroux describes in an interview with Kim Foster, “In part is comes from using these practical matericals, but it comes out of many things. Maybe the curtain wall sculptures are a vehicle to play out sculptural desires as well as to talk about the production of space in the city. There is a dialogue between the miniaturized, unreal or fictional scale of the glass and the spider clamp system and the real world scale of the grey racking that has as much to do with teh play of scale in a Richard Deacon or Tony Cragg, as it has to do with creating an allegory for how spaces are produced in the real world.
Image: Young & Giroux, Coaptation, 2012. Steel, acrylic, aluminum, components.
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Phase One IQ180
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50
Aperture
f/14
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In Coaptation (2012), Young & Giroux combine the curtain wall with a racking system, as the main structural feature.

As Christian Giroux describes in an interview with Kim Foster, “In part is comes from using these practical matericals, but it comes out of many things. Maybe the curtain wall sculptures are a vehicle to play out sculptural desires as well as to talk about the production of space in the city. There is a dialogue between the miniaturized, unreal or fictional scale of the glass and the spider clamp system and the real world scale of the grey racking that has as much to do with teh play of scale in a Richard Deacon or Tony Cragg, as it has to do with creating an allegory for how spaces are produced in the real world.

Image: Young & Giroux, Coaptation, 2012. Steel, acrylic, aluminum, components.

6current exhibitions, young & giroux,

Welcome back from Thanksgiving! Tonight is the October edition of DOUBLE MAJOR and it’ll be a good one! Just ask Amy Peterson from Fright Night (1985).

See you tonight!

6double major, fright night,

Kenneth Lochhead, My daughters, my wild girls…tonight you found the moon, 1961. Ink on paper.
ZoomInfo
Camera
Canon EOS 5D Mark II
ISO
200
Aperture
f/9
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1/2th
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Kenneth Lochhead, My daughters, my wild girls…tonight you found the moon, 1961. Ink on paper.

6International Day of the Girl, Kenneth Lochhead, collection,

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