Today is the UN’s International Day of the Girl. In this print by Victoria Mamngusqualuk from 1990, which was featured in The Past is Present: Memory and Continuity in the Tyler/Brooks Collection of Inuit Art, the story of a girl chased and captured by a large bird is told in a sequence of scenes within the same composition. By the end of this Inuit story, which was told in Western and Central Arctic, the girl escapes through courage and ingenuity to find her way back home.
As curator Anne de Stecher wrote about the print, the story emphasizes Inuit values and what was esteemed in a woman – the qualities of resourcefulness and resilience that allow the girl to escape. The lesson of the story is that girls are strong, physically capable, and able to fend for themselves and their families.
Happy International Day of the Girl!
Image: Victoria Mamngusqualuk, Girl Escaping from Eagle’s Nest, 1990. Woodcut and stencil.
ZoomInfo
Camera
Canon EOS 30D
ISO
320
Aperture
f/8
Exposure
1/60th
Focal Length
113mm

Today is the UN’s International Day of the Girl. In this print by Victoria Mamngusqualuk from 1990, which was featured in The Past is Present: Memory and Continuity in the Tyler/Brooks Collection of Inuit Art, the story of a girl chased and captured by a large bird is told in a sequence of scenes within the same composition. By the end of this Inuit story, which was told in Western and Central Arctic, the girl escapes through courage and ingenuity to find her way back home.

As curator Anne de Stecher wrote about the print, the story emphasizes Inuit values and what was esteemed in a woman – the qualities of resourcefulness and resilience that allow the girl to escape. The lesson of the story is that girls are strong, physically capable, and able to fend for themselves and their families.

Happy International Day of the Girl!

Image: Victoria Mamngusqualuk, Girl Escaping from Eagle’s Nest, 1990. Woodcut and stencil.

6collection, Victoria Mamngusqualuk, IDG2013, International Day of the Girl,

Collection Friday!
Carl Schaefer, Apples, 1935. Wood engraving on paper.
ZoomInfo
Camera
Canon EOS 30D
ISO
500
Aperture
f/8
Exposure
1/100th
Focal Length
77mm

Collection Friday!

Carl Schaefer, Apples, 1935. Wood engraving on paper.

6collection friday, collection, Carl Schaefer, medium,

Ottawa Art Scene: October 10 - 16

While there is not a lot going on during the long weekend (everyone will presumably be eating and making merry with the turkeys), there are a few events happening before and after Thanksgiving.

Local artist Raymond Aubin has a new show of photo-works opening at City Hall Art Gallery tonight. His interest in public spaces, and the way that we connect to them has inspired a series "Au jour le jour" (From Day to Day), in which he uses a technique that creates an illusion of movement, linking his practice with video. If you can’t make the vernissage tonight, there will be an artist talk on the 27th of October.

If you’re hanging out with kids this weekend (nieces, nephews, cousins, etc.) and need something to do, head over to the Ottawa Art Gallery on Sunday for the return of their Creative Sundays program, where anyone can participate in free art-making activities throughout Sundays in the fall. This Sunday, they’ll be playing with a photo booth and making collages.

On Tuesday evening, the October edition of DOUBLE MAJOR will be held here at the gallery. The topics are permaculture (sustainable ecological design) and “beautiful monsters” (think Edward Cullin). Join us for the Halloween edition of our popular lecture series!

Get outside this weekend, and don’t forget to overeat!

6ottarts,

Last week, Vancouver-based artist Raymond Boisjoly visited the Carleton University Art Gallery to explore The George and Joanne MacDonald Collection of Northwest Coast Graphic Art as research for his upcoming 2014 Collection Intervention exhibition.
Here are some snapshots of him and curator Heather Anderson in the prep room as they look through the prints (over 600, including prints by acclaimed artists like Bill Reid, Susan Point, Tony Hunt, Robert Davidson, Freda Diesing, and Ron Hamilton), catalogues, and other ephemera (there’s even a towel in there!) that were collected by past CMC Director George MacDonald over the span of 20 years. 
Raymond also gave a talk on his artistic practice to Ruth Phillips’ Art History seminar, Printmaking in Modern Northwest Coast Aboriginal Art.
Raymond Boisjoly is an artist from Chilliwack whose work engages issues of Aboriginality, language as a cultural practice, and experiential aspects of materiality. He has participated in exhibitions at The Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery, The Vancouver Art Gallery, Western Bridge and numerous artist-run centres. He teaches at Emily Carr University of Art + Design and currently lives in Vancouver.
ZoomInfo
Last week, Vancouver-based artist Raymond Boisjoly visited the Carleton University Art Gallery to explore The George and Joanne MacDonald Collection of Northwest Coast Graphic Art as research for his upcoming 2014 Collection Intervention exhibition.
Here are some snapshots of him and curator Heather Anderson in the prep room as they look through the prints (over 600, including prints by acclaimed artists like Bill Reid, Susan Point, Tony Hunt, Robert Davidson, Freda Diesing, and Ron Hamilton), catalogues, and other ephemera (there’s even a towel in there!) that were collected by past CMC Director George MacDonald over the span of 20 years. 
Raymond also gave a talk on his artistic practice to Ruth Phillips’ Art History seminar, Printmaking in Modern Northwest Coast Aboriginal Art.
Raymond Boisjoly is an artist from Chilliwack whose work engages issues of Aboriginality, language as a cultural practice, and experiential aspects of materiality. He has participated in exhibitions at The Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery, The Vancouver Art Gallery, Western Bridge and numerous artist-run centres. He teaches at Emily Carr University of Art + Design and currently lives in Vancouver.
ZoomInfo
Last week, Vancouver-based artist Raymond Boisjoly visited the Carleton University Art Gallery to explore The George and Joanne MacDonald Collection of Northwest Coast Graphic Art as research for his upcoming 2014 Collection Intervention exhibition.
Here are some snapshots of him and curator Heather Anderson in the prep room as they look through the prints (over 600, including prints by acclaimed artists like Bill Reid, Susan Point, Tony Hunt, Robert Davidson, Freda Diesing, and Ron Hamilton), catalogues, and other ephemera (there’s even a towel in there!) that were collected by past CMC Director George MacDonald over the span of 20 years. 
Raymond also gave a talk on his artistic practice to Ruth Phillips’ Art History seminar, Printmaking in Modern Northwest Coast Aboriginal Art.
Raymond Boisjoly is an artist from Chilliwack whose work engages issues of Aboriginality, language as a cultural practice, and experiential aspects of materiality. He has participated in exhibitions at The Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery, The Vancouver Art Gallery, Western Bridge and numerous artist-run centres. He teaches at Emily Carr University of Art + Design and currently lives in Vancouver.
ZoomInfo
Last week, Vancouver-based artist Raymond Boisjoly visited the Carleton University Art Gallery to explore The George and Joanne MacDonald Collection of Northwest Coast Graphic Art as research for his upcoming 2014 Collection Intervention exhibition.
Here are some snapshots of him and curator Heather Anderson in the prep room as they look through the prints (over 600, including prints by acclaimed artists like Bill Reid, Susan Point, Tony Hunt, Robert Davidson, Freda Diesing, and Ron Hamilton), catalogues, and other ephemera (there’s even a towel in there!) that were collected by past CMC Director George MacDonald over the span of 20 years. 
Raymond also gave a talk on his artistic practice to Ruth Phillips’ Art History seminar, Printmaking in Modern Northwest Coast Aboriginal Art.
Raymond Boisjoly is an artist from Chilliwack whose work engages issues of Aboriginality, language as a cultural practice, and experiential aspects of materiality. He has participated in exhibitions at The Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery, The Vancouver Art Gallery, Western Bridge and numerous artist-run centres. He teaches at Emily Carr University of Art + Design and currently lives in Vancouver.
ZoomInfo
Last week, Vancouver-based artist Raymond Boisjoly visited the Carleton University Art Gallery to explore The George and Joanne MacDonald Collection of Northwest Coast Graphic Art as research for his upcoming 2014 Collection Intervention exhibition.
Here are some snapshots of him and curator Heather Anderson in the prep room as they look through the prints (over 600, including prints by acclaimed artists like Bill Reid, Susan Point, Tony Hunt, Robert Davidson, Freda Diesing, and Ron Hamilton), catalogues, and other ephemera (there’s even a towel in there!) that were collected by past CMC Director George MacDonald over the span of 20 years. 
Raymond also gave a talk on his artistic practice to Ruth Phillips’ Art History seminar, Printmaking in Modern Northwest Coast Aboriginal Art.
Raymond Boisjoly is an artist from Chilliwack whose work engages issues of Aboriginality, language as a cultural practice, and experiential aspects of materiality. He has participated in exhibitions at The Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery, The Vancouver Art Gallery, Western Bridge and numerous artist-run centres. He teaches at Emily Carr University of Art + Design and currently lives in Vancouver.
ZoomInfo
Last week, Vancouver-based artist Raymond Boisjoly visited the Carleton University Art Gallery to explore The George and Joanne MacDonald Collection of Northwest Coast Graphic Art as research for his upcoming 2014 Collection Intervention exhibition.
Here are some snapshots of him and curator Heather Anderson in the prep room as they look through the prints (over 600, including prints by acclaimed artists like Bill Reid, Susan Point, Tony Hunt, Robert Davidson, Freda Diesing, and Ron Hamilton), catalogues, and other ephemera (there’s even a towel in there!) that were collected by past CMC Director George MacDonald over the span of 20 years. 
Raymond also gave a talk on his artistic practice to Ruth Phillips’ Art History seminar, Printmaking in Modern Northwest Coast Aboriginal Art.
Raymond Boisjoly is an artist from Chilliwack whose work engages issues of Aboriginality, language as a cultural practice, and experiential aspects of materiality. He has participated in exhibitions at The Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery, The Vancouver Art Gallery, Western Bridge and numerous artist-run centres. He teaches at Emily Carr University of Art + Design and currently lives in Vancouver.
ZoomInfo

Last week, Vancouver-based artist Raymond Boisjoly visited the Carleton University Art Gallery to explore The George and Joanne MacDonald Collection of Northwest Coast Graphic Art as research for his upcoming 2014 Collection Intervention exhibition.

Here are some snapshots of him and curator Heather Anderson in the prep room as they look through the prints (over 600, including prints by acclaimed artists like Bill Reid, Susan Point, Tony Hunt, Robert Davidson, Freda Diesing, and Ron Hamilton), catalogues, and other ephemera (there’s even a towel in there!) that were collected by past CMC Director George MacDonald over the span of 20 years.

Raymond also gave a talk on his artistic practice to Ruth Phillips’ Art History seminar, Printmaking in Modern Northwest Coast Aboriginal Art.

Raymond Boisjoly is an artist from Chilliwack whose work engages issues of Aboriginality, language as a cultural practice, and experiential aspects of materiality. He has participated in exhibitions at The Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery, The Vancouver Art Gallery, Western Bridge and numerous artist-run centres. He teaches at Emily Carr University of Art + Design and currently lives in Vancouver.

6collection intervention, raymond boisjoly, behind the scenes,

Flavorwire just released a list of 50 Scariest Books of All Time. Which ones would be on your list? Will you be reading scary books instead of horror films this Halloween season?

I can’t get enough of the cover designs (like this one and this one).

Image: Henry James, The Turn of the Screw.

6halloween, books,

Collection Friday!
Carl Schaefer, Grey Day (Redstone Lake, Haliburton), 1937. Watercolour on paper.
ZoomInfo
Camera
Canon EOS 5D Mark II
ISO
200
Aperture
f/9
Exposure
1/3th
Focal Length
100mm

Collection Friday!

Carl Schaefer, Grey Day (Redstone Lake, Haliburton), 1937. Watercolour on paper.

6collection, collection friday, Carl Schaefer, medium,

Ottawa Art Scene: October 3 - 9

There are a couple of fun events happening at CUAG this week: a tour of Laura Letinsky’s exhibitions and film screening of Food Inc. (in collaboration with Food Centre’s Hunger Awareness Week) on Monday evening and a Curator Tour and Open House for Y & G #12 (curtain walls) tomorrow afternoon, which is part of Architecture Week Ottawa.

Elsewhere in the city, there are tours, new exhibitions, and more!

Last night at the National Gallery of Canada, the RBC Painting Prize was awarded to the Vancouver-based artist Colleen Heslin for her acrylic and dye on cotton works. Colin Muir Dorward (who exhibited his MFA thesis show at CUAG in the summer) was given an honourable mention. You can see works by all the finalists at the NGC tonight (and until the middle of October),

Friday night is the Ottawa School of Art’s annual fundraiser, Small Medium Large. You can pick up a work by a local artist, have a drink, and listen to the beats of DJ Jas Nasty.

Another curatorial walk-through happening at the Ottawa Art Gallery on Saturday afternoon. Michael Schreier will be giving a tour of exhibition Dave Heath: A Heritage of Meaning, An Introspection.

The Ottawa Public Library has been putting on some great talks recently! On Wednesday, Larry Kardish, former Senior Curator of Film at MoMA will be giving a talk on the intersection of art and technology in film.This looks quite interesting!

6ottarts,

Did you know that next week is Hunger Awareness Week on campus? There will be tons of activities happening around campus, like breakfast clubs and info sessions.

And on Monday evening, CUAG is teaming up with Carleton University Student Association’s Food Centre for a screening of Food, Inc. (check out the trailer here) and a tour of our exhibition Laura Letinsky: Still Life Photographs, 1997-2012.

Join us at 6pm on Monday for some art, film, and popcorn!

6ottarts, student collaborations, Food Centre,

Love this.

In conjunction with Y & G #12 (curtain walls), Janine Debanné will be giving CUAG’s first ever Lunchtime Lecture on Thursday, October 24th at 12:15pm. Bring your lunch and hear about Mies Van der Rohe’s Lafayette Park project in Detroit.

hyperallergic:

Parents Just Don’t Understand Their Creative Kids

imageNext stop … a Pritzker!

View Post

Source: hyperallergic

6current exhibitions, cuag event, janine debanne, mies van der rohe, young & giroux, medium,

-