Are you an artist? Are you part of the Carleton community as a student, alumni, faculty, staff, or retiree? Then submit your artwork for our Carleton Community Art Exhibition! 

You can submit up to TWO art works. All the details (along with the entry form and FAQ) can be found here.

Please share widely!!! We want to see this gallery OVERFLOWING with YOUR art! :)

6student collaborations, carleton community art exhibition, medium,

If you’re feeling far away from all the Rob Ford action in Toronto…
Check out Young & Giroux’s decidedly less drama-filled video work, Camera Tracking a Spiral Down the Two Curved Towers of Viljo Revell’s Toronto City Hall (2010), now on view as part of Y & G #12 (curtain walls).
The artists’ quiet and contemplative view of this building, which was designed to echo idealism of democracy in municipal politics, provides a stark contrast to everything that has happened so far…
ZoomInfo
If you’re feeling far away from all the Rob Ford action in Toronto…
Check out Young & Giroux’s decidedly less drama-filled video work, Camera Tracking a Spiral Down the Two Curved Towers of Viljo Revell’s Toronto City Hall (2010), now on view as part of Y & G #12 (curtain walls).
The artists’ quiet and contemplative view of this building, which was designed to echo idealism of democracy in municipal politics, provides a stark contrast to everything that has happened so far…
ZoomInfo
If you’re feeling far away from all the Rob Ford action in Toronto…
Check out Young & Giroux’s decidedly less drama-filled video work, Camera Tracking a Spiral Down the Two Curved Towers of Viljo Revell’s Toronto City Hall (2010), now on view as part of Y & G #12 (curtain walls).
The artists’ quiet and contemplative view of this building, which was designed to echo idealism of democracy in municipal politics, provides a stark contrast to everything that has happened so far…
ZoomInfo
If you’re feeling far away from all the Rob Ford action in Toronto…
Check out Young & Giroux’s decidedly less drama-filled video work, Camera Tracking a Spiral Down the Two Curved Towers of Viljo Revell’s Toronto City Hall (2010), now on view as part of Y & G #12 (curtain walls).
The artists’ quiet and contemplative view of this building, which was designed to echo idealism of democracy in municipal politics, provides a stark contrast to everything that has happened so far…
ZoomInfo

If you’re feeling far away from all the Rob Ford action in Toronto…

Check out Young & Giroux’s decidedly less drama-filled video work, Camera Tracking a Spiral Down the Two Curved Towers of Viljo Revell’s Toronto City Hall (2010), now on view as part of Y & G #12 (curtain walls).

The artists’ quiet and contemplative view of this building, which was designed to echo idealism of democracy in municipal politics, provides a stark contrast to everything that has happened so far

6current exhibitions, young & giroux, topoli, toronto city hall,

It’s the weekend. Let’s party!
Collection Friday!
Max Beckmann, Tauentzienpalast, 1920. Drypoint on paper.
ZoomInfo
Camera
Nikon D300
ISO
200
Aperture
f/18
Exposure
1/160th
Focal Length
70mm

It’s the weekend. Let’s party!

Collection Friday!

Max Beckmann, Tauentzienpalast, 1920. Drypoint on paper.

6collection, collection friday, max beckmann, medium,

Ottawa Art Scene: November 14 - 20

SAW Gallery’s mega video art biennial, Art Star, kicks off tonight. During the Opening Night Party, you can check out the six-channel video installation by Elle Flanders and Tamira Sawatsky that transports the viewer into the segregated and occupied world of Palestine. Screenings are happening throughout the next few days, including works by Thirza Jean Cuthand, Basma Alsharif (co-presented by SAW Video), Sophie Calle, Isabelle Pauwels, and Rithy Panh. All the details are here.

The season of Craft Fairs is upon us, and Apt 613 has done a great round-up of them all. This weekend is the Glebe Artisan and Craft Show at the Glebe Community Centre. Start your gift lists now!

Over in Gatineau, AXENEO7 has organized a closing event for Stephan St.-Laurent’s show, “Please Don’t Feed the Animals” on Wednesday night. The event, “Fine Cuisine for the Street Cats of Hull”, will include a performance by the legendary Carolee Schneeman, (cat) food by Chez Edgar’s Marysol Foucault, and much more. No judging if we sneak some of Marysol’s treats for ourselves?

Have fun this week!

6ottarts,

movembermadness:

Ron Burgundy (and his jazz flute) support Movember!

Next week, the Carleton Film Society is celebrating Movember at the Carleton University Art Gallery with a screening of student-made movie trailers inspired by the glorious moustache. There’s will also be a bonus screening of Anchorman.

Everyone is welcome! Join us on Wednesday, 20 November in the Art Gallery. The film screening starts at 7pm.

Source: movembermadness

6movember, carleton film society, student collaborations,

On View: Carleton Curatorial Lab: The Nature of Beasts in 17th-century Prints
Marcus Gheeraerts the Elder (c. 1520 - c. 1590)
Philip Galle (1537-1612), publisher in Antwerp
Ostrich, eagles and other birds (before 1590). Engraving from a model book. Private collection.
Marcus Gheeraerts the Elder was one of the first European artists to situate creatures in detailed landscapes. His landscapes tended to be generic or fantastical, and the creates - in this case, three views of an ostrich, two eagles feasting on a hare, and other birds - did not actively interact as they would in prints by later artists such as Barlow.
Gheeraerts nevertheless broke new ground, producing some of the most naturalistic-looking creatures to date in his illustrated Aesop, Fabulen der Dieren (Bruges, 1567). A century later, Barlow adapted some of the Fabulen compositions, updating them with creatures and landscapes details studied from life.
- from Nathan Fils, curator.
ZoomInfo
Camera
Canon EOS 30D
ISO
400
Aperture
f/7.1
Exposure
1/80th
Focal Length
63mm

On View: Carleton Curatorial Lab: The Nature of Beasts in 17th-century Prints

Marcus Gheeraerts the Elder (c. 1520 - c. 1590)

Philip Galle (1537-1612), publisher in Antwerp

Ostrich, eagles and other birds (before 1590). Engraving from a model book. Private collection.

Marcus Gheeraerts the Elder was one of the first European artists to situate creatures in detailed landscapes. His landscapes tended to be generic or fantastical, and the creates - in this case, three views of an ostrich, two eagles feasting on a hare, and other birds - did not actively interact as they would in prints by later artists such as Barlow.

Gheeraerts nevertheless broke new ground, producing some of the most naturalistic-looking creatures to date in his illustrated Aesop, Fabulen der Dieren (Bruges, 1567). A century later, Barlow adapted some of the Fabulen compositions, updating them with creatures and landscapes details studied from life.

- from Nathan Fils, curator.

6current exhibitions, medium, printmaking, campus curatorial laboratory,

Art in Conversation: The Fantasy Architecture of Étienne-Louis Boullée and Young & Giroux

Art in Conversation is a monthly series that features pieces from CUAG’s collection and exhibitions in dialogue with cultural trends, current events, and local and global arts communities. Art isn’t just for looking at – here, we explore art as an interactive social phenomenon.

Fantasy architecture –the imagined-yet-never-built forms drawn from the most uninhibited recesses of the architect’s mind – is perhaps more intriguing than its physical counterpart, built structures. Fantasies allow us to explore the improbable, logic-bending ideas for a world that does not exist.  Fantasies are born in the mind and emerge as creative gestures. Indeed, everything human-made around us is based on some sort of fantasy – a suggestion of the imagination – that is translated into a practical language of gravity, economy, resources, etc. Take for example, your cell phone, your bicycle, or something as seemingly mundane as a light bulb.  From embryonic flickerings of the minds of Martin Cooper, Karl von Drais, and Nikola Tesla, these ideas were pursued with uncertain determination through sketches, elaborate drawings, scale models, and prototypes.

Architecture – as an art form, as an orderer of space and of social interactions, and as that which can assign to us the security of habitat – is no different. The buildings we are surrounded by can be traced back to hastily scrawled sketches within notebooks, to the mind of an individual with a fantasy. Yet, not all architecture is built. Some remain as conceptual design – as pure possibility.

Over two-hundred years ago, French architect and artist Étienne-Louis Boullée dazzled his contemporaries with impossible architectural schemes and still continues to amaze us today. Working in the neoclassical style of the eighteenth century, Boullée looked past the aesthetic vogue of ordered columns, temple façades, and rounded arches. Instead, he sought to explore the very essence of the classical tradition – rationality, order, clarity, geometry, symmetry – demanding from it what no one had before.

Of his most famous designs there is the Cenotaph for Sir Isaac Newton (1784), a sprawling, immense spherical structure that was to commemorate the late British scientist. One hundred and fifty metres tall, it was meant to simulate night and day with  small holes at the top of the sphere to let sunlight through that would create an effect of seeing the cosmos in the darkened chamber during day time. During night time, sunlight would be imitated with a massive suspended orb of light.

image(Image via)

In another design, Deuxième projet pour la Bibliothèque du Roi (1785), Boullée pushes the limits of architectural reality with a structurally impossible vaulted ceiling: the very place from which a skylight is carved is where the ceiling must be structurally the strongest. It is fantasy that pervades these works, the desire to put something that is entirely surreal into the context of reality.

image (Image via)

Looking at CUAG’s current exhibition, Y & G #12 (curtain walls), this same fantasy is present. The Canadian duo’s three sculptural forms, Chagrin (2013), Eunoia (2013), and Coaptation (2012) do not fail to remind us of something we have already seen, but not quite as we have seen it. Just as Boullée manipulated the boundaries of neoclassical form, so do Daniel Young and Christian Giroux with Modern architecture. Rather than simply playing upon the aesthetic of the revolutionary curtain wall (a wall which is not structurally necessary for the building), Young & Giroux pose questions about the nature of the modern form – of its ubiquitous monotony, of its unapologetic angularity, and of its resistance to adornment. In this way, these works act as sorts or prototypes for artistic imagination, not unlike those of inventors. In fact, during a talk with curator Diana Nemiroff at the Carleton University Art Gallery in September, Christian Giroux stated that he and Young “invoke the idea of the prototyper”, because although their work includes “a lot of hand-processing and crafting,” there are many links to the industrial world as well. As Nemiroff observes, they are “positioned in between” these spaces.

These sculptures do not mimic any particular modern building, nor would it be probable to construct them as buildings themselves. They are elaborate models of architectural imagination intended as reflections upon our built environment and as materialisations of fantasy.

image(Young & Giroux, Chagrin, 2013. Steel, extruded aluminum, acrylic, components. Image courtesy of the artists.)

image                                  (Young & Giroux, Eunoia, 2013. Steel, extruded aluminum, acrylic, components. Image courtesy of the artists.)

image(Young & Giroux, Coaptation, 2012. Steel, extruded aluminum, acrylic, components. Image courtesy of the artists.)

Y & G #12 (curtain walls) will be exhibited until December 15.

Leona Nikolic is a fourth-year Art History student. She is usually covered in glitter. You can read more from her at the Carleton Art History Department website and at the Art and Science Journal.

6Carleton University, Carleton University Art Gallery, cuag collection, medium, etienne louis boullée, young & giroux, christian giroux, daniel young, Architecture, modern architecture, student collaborations, current exhibitions,

Today is Remembrance Day, and crowds are gathering at the War Memorial this morning for the ceremony.
Wherever you are today, give a moment of silence at 11 o’clock today.
Here is Philip Bergerson’s photograph Fallen Soldiers’ Names in Bronze, from the series Shards of Civilization (1991).
Check out these photographs of World War I and II, from The Gazette.
ZoomInfo
Camera
Canon EOS 30D
ISO
640
Aperture
f/5
Exposure
1/50th
Focal Length
37mm

Today is Remembrance Day, and crowds are gathering at the War Memorial this morning for the ceremony.

Wherever you are today, give a moment of silence at 11 o’clock today.

Here is Philip Bergerson’s photograph Fallen Soldiers’ Names in Bronze, from the series Shards of Civilization (1991).

Check out these photographs of World War I and II, from The Gazette.

6Remembrance day, collection, medium,

Congratulations to Erin Shirreff, who won the AIMIA | AGO Photography Prize last night!

You can check out her work online here OR come in to CUAG to pick up the beautiful catalogue from her solo exhibition here in 2012. The catalogue was co-produced with the Agnes Etherington Art Centre, Queen’s University, and Contemporary Art Gallery, Vancouver. 

Image: Erin Shirreff, Lake, video still, 2012. Colour video, silent, 44 minute loop.

6Erin Shirreff, photography, medium,

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