Collection Friday!
Michael Schreier, Untitled, from the series C, 1980. Azo dye print on paper.
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Canon EOS 30D
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500
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Collection Friday!

Michael Schreier, Untitled, from the series C, 1980. Azo dye print on paper.

6Michael Schreier, medium,

Ottawa Art Scene: May 23 - 28

This weekend is the Great Glebe Garage Sale - who needs anything else?? But in case you’re still looking for something to do, you’re in luck! The weekend is packed with new exhibitions, screenings, workshops, and art fairs.

Central Art Garage (did you see their great profile on CTV?) has a new show opening tonight. Habitat Here features three Ottawa-based artists, Lorraine Gilbert, Frank Shebageget, and Amy Thompson, who have helped shape and promote the Ottawa visual arts community.

Speaking of the local art scene, CUAG friend and Carleton PhD candidate Anna Khimasia will be leading another one of Ottawa Art Gallery’s great Art Writing Workshop series on Saturday. She’ll be addressing what it means to be critical in art writing - and what spaces are available to us to state opinions and engage in critical debates.

On Saturday afternoon, bike down to CUAG for our Making Otherwise screening and artist talk with Anthea Black and Janet Morton. Anthea will be showing a series of videos by artists like Joyce Wieland and Charles and Ray Eames, who incorporate craft and the handmade into their film practices. Janet’s videos Shiny Heart and Roadtrip have been a big hit in our Making Otherwise exhibition - come ask her how she made a perfect knitted cover for a tuba!

The new show at Gallery 101, BUZZ: Getting to Know Other Animals, looks really interesting: using images and research from the Canadian National Collection of Insects, Arachnids, and Nematodes, contemporary artists Kimberly Edgar, Deborah Margo, Bioni Samp, and Amy Swartz, strike a fine balance between thoroughly researched subject matter and artistic excellence. If you’re going to the sold-out Nature Nocturne on Friday (themed “glow-in-the-dark”), they have also organized a Bioni Samp performance, Hive Synthesis Mix (Live Electronics + DJ Mix) in conjunction with the exhibition.

Ravenswing Art + Music Fair is taking place on Sunday in Minto Park. Check out 80+ vendors, plus cool concerts, free skill-sharing workshops, and food trucks galore. Sunday looks like it will be mainly sunny (and 25 degrees!) so bring a blanket to sit on, and hang out all day!

Have a great weekend!

6ottarts,

Upcoming event at CUAG: CUAG Curator Tours of “Imaginary Worlds: Scottie Wilson and Art Brut” and “Inuit Art: Skin Deep”

Sunday, 1 June 2014 at 2 p.m.

Please join us for an afternoon of guided exhibition tours with Pauline Goutain, one of the co-curators of “Imaginary Worlds: Scottie Wilson and Art Brut,” and Lisa Truong, curator of “Inuit Art: Skin Deep.” Goutain will be speaking about Scottie Wilson’s reception in Europe, where he was characterized by Jean Dubuffet as exemplary of art brut (“raw” or “rough” art). Truong will talk about the enormous importance of skins and skin clothing in Inuit culture, past and present.

Image: Jessie Oonark, Tattooed Faces, 1960. Stonecut on paper, ed. 9/50. Carleton University Art Gallery: Gift of Drew and Carolle Anne Armour, 2009.

6current exhibitions, medium,

On View: Janet Morton, Road Trip, 2012. Video shot and edited by Nick Montgomery, 60 min 5 sec. Unraveling by Robert Kingsbury.

Many of Guelph-based artist Janet Morton’s projects are large scale and public, such as Memorial (1992), a giant knitted work sock that she draped over public statues, and Cozy (1999), the cover she assembled for a house on Toronto’s Ward’s Island from 800 recycled sweaters.

Although Janet Morton’s knitting is rooted in sculptural practice, it is also time-based and performative. Returning to video in several recent collaborations, Morton foregrounds the ephemerality of repetitive labour by unraveling her knitting for the camera. This (un)making emphasizes process over the static handmade object.

In Road Trip, a man wearing a white knitted suit walks through the outskirts of town, unravelling his unorthodox garment and winding it into an ever-growing ball of wool. The spectacle of his homemade suit and increasingly exposed body highlight the “male” backdrop of auto repair shops, gas stations, and trucks. Focused on his task, the performer doesnt miss a step as he unravels one leg, then the other, until he wearing only socks and sneakers as he strolls into a park-like setting.

You can watch the whole Road Trip at CUAG as part of Making Otherwise: Craft and Material Fluency in Contemporary Art, on now until September 14, 2014.

6current exhibitions, Making Otherwise, Janet Morton, medium,

Collection Friday!
Ron Martin, Untitled (July 10, 1996), from the series Foil Work, 1996.
Watercolour and graphite on paper.
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Canon EOS 5D Mark II
ISO
200
Aperture
f/9
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1/2th
Focal Length
100mm

Collection Friday!

Ron Martin, Untitled (July 10, 1996), from the series Foil Work, 1996.

Watercolour and graphite on paper.

6collection friday, cuag collection, Ron Martin, medium,

Ottawa Art Scene: May 15 - 21

We’re heading into the first long weekend of the summer (!), and good news for those of us staying in town: there are a TON of arts events happening around the city.

First up, new-ish gallery Studio Sixty Six (in our ‘hood!) presents an exhibition curated by Guillermo Trejo called PUSH: The New Printmakers. Featuring students from the OSA printmaking program, the show showcases emerging artists doing exciting things with prints in the city.

Also tonight, the opening of a long-in-the-making installation of Vera Frenkel’s …from the Transit Bar at the National Gallery of Canada. A fully functional bar (for reals), the space was first set up at DOCUMENTA, and recounts perennial themes in Frenkel’s oeuvre related to issues of exile, cultural migration, translation, and the indeterminacy of meaning. Meet you there for a drink?

On Saturday, there is another workshop in Ottawa Art Gallery’s traveling series on Artist Books. This Saturday, the workshop takes place at Bériault Branch in Orléans. Create an artwork in the form of a book, using an everyday sticky-note pad, and participate in an exchange with other artists! Check when the other sessions are happening, if you’re not in Orléans.

This weekend marks the beginning of Chinatown Remixed, one of the city great art and community festivals. Artists take over the restaurants and shops along Somerset for a month, celebrating this cool neighbourhood and the artists of this city! On Saturday, there’s a day-long "vernissage" with music, child-friendly workshops, live food demos, and a whole lot more! Afterparty at Shanghai Restaurant parking lot.

Also this week, a three-day symposium on video art, animation and experimental cinema at Daïmôn. With presentations and panel discussions with artists, curators, and scholars, the bilingual symposium is tackling questions of collage in video art, and include screenings and performances in the evening.

Get at it! Enjoy some art this long weekend!

6ottarts,

Upcoming Event at CUAG:  "Making Otherwise" Screening + Artist Conversation: Anthea Black’s Pleasure Craft and video works by Janet Morton

Please join us for a screening and conversation with Anthea Black and Janet Morton, moderated by Heather Anderson. Artist, curator, and writer Anthea Black will present Pleasure Craft, which explores appearances of craft and handmaking in film and video from the 1960s to the present, where craft is a temporal process rather than a fixed object. An artist in CUAG’s current exhibition Making Otherwise, Janet Morton will screen a selection of her video work that signals a shift in her knitted work from the sculptural object to process and ephemerality.

For more info and artist bios.

Image: Color Rhythm, The Color Collective (Johanna Autin, Carissa Carman, Sarah Gotowka), 8 minutes, Video, 2009-2012. Image courtesy of The Colour Collective.

6current exhibitions, Making Otherwise, Janet Morton, Color Collective, Anthea Black, medium,

On View: Scottie Wilson, Untitled (Far Eastern Town), 1942. Ink and coloured pencil on paper. Carleton University Art Gallery: Bequest of Mrs. Frances Barwick to the Department of Art History, Carleton University; transferred to the University Art Collection
From Imaginary Worlds: Scottie Wilson and “Art Brut,” on now at CUAG until September 7.
In Europe, Scottie Wilson is regarded as one of the most famous Outsider artists, and is often presented as a classic example of an art brut creaor. Born in Glasgow around 1890, “Scottie” (Louis Freeman) came from a working-class family and left school at an early age. In the 1930s, he immigrated to Canada and opened a second hand furniture shop in Toronto. There, he began to draw without any artistic training - “all of a sudden,” he said - using a pen and coloured inks. He then abandoned his business because “he could not stop drawing” and dedicated himself entirely to art-making.
As this Hyperallergic review of New York’s Outsider Art Fair points out, “though outsider art’s claim to being is grounded in a theoretical rejection of art-historical power structures, those artists canonized as outsiders by major institutions remain suspiciously homogenous.” Indeed, as Imaginary Worlds curator Pauline Goutain points out, “Long before he was “discovered” by Jean Dubuffet, Scottie had already achieved significant recognition in Canada. His drawings were acquired by the world’s most famous museums, including the Tate and Museum of Modern Art.”
ZoomInfo
Camera
Canon EOS 5D Mark II
ISO
200
Aperture
f/9
Exposure
1/2th
Focal Length
100mm

On View: Scottie Wilson, Untitled (Far Eastern Town), 1942. Ink and coloured pencil on paper. Carleton University Art Gallery: Bequest of Mrs. Frances Barwick to the Department of Art History, Carleton University; transferred to the University Art Collection

From Imaginary Worlds: Scottie Wilson and “Art Brut,” on now at CUAG until September 7.

In Europe, Scottie Wilson is regarded as one of the most famous Outsider artists, and is often presented as a classic example of an art brut creaor. Born in Glasgow around 1890, “Scottie” (Louis Freeman) came from a working-class family and left school at an early age. In the 1930s, he immigrated to Canada and opened a second hand furniture shop in Toronto. There, he began to draw without any artistic training - “all of a sudden,” he said - using a pen and coloured inks. He then abandoned his business because “he could not stop drawing” and dedicated himself entirely to art-making.

As this Hyperallergic review of New York’s Outsider Art Fair points out, “though outsider art’s claim to being is grounded in a theoretical rejection of art-historical power structures, those artists canonized as outsiders by major institutions remain suspiciously homogenous.” Indeed, as Imaginary Worlds curator Pauline Goutain points out, “Long before he was “discovered” by Jean Dubuffet, Scottie had already achieved significant recognition in Canada. His drawings were acquired by the world’s most famous museums, including the Tate and Museum of Modern Art.”

6Scottie Wilson, current exhibitions, medium,

Biking to CUAG tonight for our opening reception? We’ve updated our map to include the directions to the gallery by bike!

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