Ottawa Art Scene: March 20 - 26

Tonight marks the launch of Guerilla Magazine’s week-long GuerillaCRAWL, in support of the magazine’s 10th anniversary edition. Check out tons of art, media, and cultural events this week, starting at Patrick Mikhail Gallery with the art exhibition "K-14", street photography by Jonathan Lorange. Throughout the week there will be vernissages, art parties, film screenings, and more! A great way to celebrate creativity in the city.

Also tonight, Christopher Rhode, the programmer at SAW Video, has curated an evening of Dennis Tourbin’s video works, ABCDelevision: The Videos of Dennis Tourbin, in conjunction with CUAG’s exhibition Dennis Tourbin: The Language of Visual Poetry. The screening is happening at Club SAW, so head downtown to explore this other aspect of Tourbin’s artistic practice.

Speaking of supporting the art community in Ottawa, on Friday evening, the University of Ottawa B.F.A. graduating class has organized an auction at Club SAW to raise money for their upcoming final exhibition. If you’re on the look-out for young artists and looking to expand (or start) your art collection, this is a great place to start! 

On Tuesday evening, the Ottawa Public Library has invited Carleton U. Art History professor Carol Payne to give a talk on the National Film Board’s photography collection, discussing in from the perspective of nation-building in the mid-twentieth century.

Have a good week!

6ottarts, Dennis Tourbin,

We are super proud that two CUAG family members - Patrick Lacasse & Alisdair MacRae - have collaborated on an exhibition at Karsh Masson Gallery at City Hall.

The official opening for Perfect Music is tomorrow night - check it out!

Image: Patrick Lacasse & Alisdair MacRae, Suspension, 2013, electronic components, metal, strings and wood / composantes électroniques, métal, cordes et bois, 8 x 117 x 21 cm. Courtesy of the artists / gracieuseté des artistes.

There are a couple events tomorrow night that CUAG is involved with, including ABCDelevision at SAW Video (downtown at Arts Court) and a special performance by American poet/activist Andrea Gibson (Res Commons 372, Carleton University). Both are FREE, open to the pubic, and guaranteed awesome ways to spend your evening.

Check out Andrea Gibson performing “How It Ends” (appropriate for the end of the semester?).

Here are the words.

6andrea gibson, dennis tourbin, poetry,

Now on view: Sharon Hayes, Her Voice, Video, black-and-white, silent; 4 minutes, looped, edition of 5 + 2 AP 

Cycling through written descriptions of female voices that Hayes culled from newspapers dating from the nineteenth century to the present, Her Voice reveals reporters’ subtle and not-so-subtle critiques of prominent female speakers. Hayes’ selection includes firsthand accounts of speeches by historical figures such as abolitionist and suffragist Anna Elizabeth Dickinson, Sojourner Truth, and contemporary figures such as Hilary Clinton and Condoleezza Rice. Highlighting the ways that gender inflects the reception of speech and journalists’ “objective” interpretations, Her Voice makes clear that the physical traits of women who speak out or are in positions of power are often scrutinized in ways that the traits of their male peers are not. This reportage evidences the distance between an actual embodied voice and its interpretation, and foregrounds the challenges women face in asserting their voices in the public sphere.

See this work as part of Sharon Hayes: Loudspeakers and Other Forms of Listening, on view at CUAG until April 27th.

6current exhibitions, Sharon Hayes, Her Voice, medium,

Happy St. Patrick’s Day!
Did you know that our home on campus, the St. Patrick’s building, used to be an independent college? You can read about the full history of the college here, which was founded in 1929 amid conflicts of language and religion in the capital. Though originally tied to the University of Ottawa, it moved to Carleton in 1967, where it became the first School of Social Work. It was ultimately completely integrated into Carleton in 1979, and when the School of Social Work moved out in the early 1990s, it provided an opening for the gallery space (designed by architect Michael Lundholm) to be built!
Photo by Sarah Eastman.
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Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

Did you know that our home on campus, the St. Patrick’s building, used to be an independent college? You can read about the full history of the college here, which was founded in 1929 amid conflicts of language and religion in the capital. Though originally tied to the University of Ottawa, it moved to Carleton in 1967, where it became the first School of Social Work. It was ultimately completely integrated into Carleton in 1979, and when the School of Social Work moved out in the early 1990s, it provided an opening for the gallery space (designed by architect Michael Lundholm) to be built!

Photo by Sarah Eastman.

6St. Patrick's Day, Carleton University, history,

Collection Friday!
Barker Fairley, Portrait of Dorothy Parker, 1939. Oil on canvas.
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Canon EOS 30D
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320
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Collection Friday!

Barker Fairley, Portrait of Dorothy Parker, 1939. Oil on canvas.

6collection friday, Barker Fairly, medium,

Ottawa Art Scene: March 13 - 19

For your weekly dose of art, there are a few vernissages to check out over the next couple of days, on both sides of the frozen river. Why let this #EndlessWinter get in our way?

Tonight, Voix Visuelle presents two new exhibitions, Weather and Vide?, which explore time and the environment. The former is a series of photographs taken by Andrzej Maciejewskiwith a homemade walk-in Camera Obscura, while Stephanie Morrissette’s photographs and video works focus on the Gaspe region, where she documented the decline of the fishing industry and the human strain on the environment.

For Friday night, you can head to La Petite Mort for the sure-to-be-packed opening at La Petite Mort ofMAIM: New Paintings by Gill King, whichexplore the idea of animals as objects, paradoxically representing nightmarish imagery like industrial farming through beautiful abstractions on the canvases. The stick n’ poke tattoos are back, as well as a special performance by contemporary dancer Kaja Irwin.

There’s a wonderful new Charles Edenshaw exhibition at the National Gallery of Canada, showcasing carvings and silverwork by the acclaimed 19th-century Haida artist. Keep an eye out for the intricate walking cane handles carved from ivory and beautiful wooden boxes.

If you’re downtown at lunch on Wednesday, there will be a talk at the Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada Art Gallery with Michelle McGeough, who curated their current exhibition Beyond Recognition: Aboriginal Abstraction.

Also on Wednesday, head to the Ottawa Art Gallery Sales + Rental for a Q&A with Ottawa-based artist Colin White, who self-publishes comics, makes art and freelances as an illustrator and graphic designer. You have probably seen his series of illustrations of local streetscapes (here’s my personal favourite) around town. The talk begins at 6 p.m.

Have a good weekend!

6ottarts,

Upcoming Event at CUAG: Screening of Norman McLaren’s ORIGINAL, UNCENSORED Neighbours (1952) - Thursday, 13 March at 3 p.m.

From the NFB blog: “McLaren got the idea to make the film as a parable on war after a trip to China with UNESCO. He had developed empathy for the Chinese people and was surprised, upon his return to Canada, to discover that China was not seen in a good light. The Korean War had cast the Chinese as the enemy, which upset McLaren and led him to make the film.”

This famous film will be presented as part of a program of short films from Carleton’s 16mm film collection. The entire program will run around forty minutes, and will be followed by a reception in the Art Gallery, located on the first floor of the St. Patrick’s Building.

This event is organized in conjunction with the Fourth Annual Carleton Film Studies Graduate Student Symposium.

6NFB, medium,

On View: Andrea Campbell, Surveillant Assemblage (2007, 2008, 2009), Motion sensored lightboxes. Courtesy of the artist.

Andrea Campbell created the lightboxes to display her collected receipts in chronological order, tracking herself through purchasing. Overlaying this information are images of her fingerprints, traces of the physical body the data beneath represents. The motion sensors connected to the lightboxes reinforce awareness of the body and tracked movement. The lightboxes reveal the amount of information that can be gathered through this collected data and its ability to speak to the identity of its body double. Not only are movements revealed, but so too is personal information, making profiling possible and raising concerns about privacy. (Text by Meredith Stewart.)

You can see Andrea Campbell’s work as part of Tracking Systems, on view now in the liminal spaces of the Carleton University Art Gallery” the first and second floor foyers and the first floor vitrine.

6current exhibitions, medium,

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