On View: Dennis Tourbin, Canoe Lake, 1981-83. Acrylic on canvas. Collection of Tom Thomson Memorial Art Gallery.
I think of myself as a writer first - you read my paintings. - Dennis Tourbin
Tourbin often referenced other artists and this work presents a meditation on the mystery surrounding the death of the iconic Canadian painter Tom Thomson. Here, Tourbin employs the motif of a ripped newspaper page in a play of revealing and concealing his text, poignantly echoing the poem’s sense of loss and the unknown. Alternately narrating the myth and addressing Thomson directly, Toubin also weaves in his own experience of the Algonquin landscape half a century later.
Dennis Tourbin: The Language of Visual Poetry is on view until Sunday, April 27.
ZoomInfo
Camera
Canon PowerShot G10
ISO
200
Aperture
f/2.8
Exposure
1/30th
Focal Length
28mm

On View: Dennis Tourbin, Canoe Lake, 1981-83. Acrylic on canvas. Collection of Tom Thomson Memorial Art Gallery.

I think of myself as a writer first - you read my paintings. - Dennis Tourbin

Tourbin often referenced other artists and this work presents a meditation on the mystery surrounding the death of the iconic Canadian painter Tom Thomson. Here, Tourbin employs the motif of a ripped newspaper page in a play of revealing and concealing his text, poignantly echoing the poem’s sense of loss and the unknown. Alternately narrating the myth and addressing Thomson directly, Toubin also weaves in his own experience of the Algonquin landscape half a century later.

Dennis Tourbin: The Language of Visual Poetry is on view until Sunday, April 27.

6current exhibitions, Dennis Tourbin,

Collection (Good) Friday!
Gerald Trottier, The Mocking of Our Lord, 1953. Watercolour, ink, and graphite on paper.
ZoomInfo
Camera
Canon EOS 5D Mark II
ISO
200
Aperture
f/9
Exposure
1/2th
Focal Length
100mm

Collection (Good) Friday!

Gerald Trottier, The Mocking of Our Lord, 1953. Watercolour, ink, and graphite on paper.

6gerald trottier, medium,

Ottawa Art Scene: April 17 - 23

Since it’s a long weekend coming up, there are not a lot of events happening (though there are some great concerts and non-visual arts events happening, like this record swap at Raw Sugar!)

Most art galleries (including us!) will be open on Saturday and Sunday, so why not spend some time checking out exhibitions around town? Dennis Tourbin and Sharon Hayes are only up for another couple of weeks, there’s a new Gerald Trottier exhibition at the Ottawa Art Gallery ART Rental and Sales Gallery, and the National Gallery always has fun exhibitions to explore (I haven’t seen the Fischli & Weiss film yet).

In the west end, pair gallery visits with delicious food: you can check out Orange Art Gallery’s new space in the City Centre complex, right next to Art-is-in Bakery, or get a soup and sandwich at Thyme & Again before seeing the "Persistence of Nature" photography exhibition at Exposure Gallery upstairs. 

Happy Easter!

6ottarts,

Upcoming Event at CUAG: CUAG Lunchtime Lecture: “Radical Politics and Forms of Listening”
Wednesday, 23 April at 12:15pm
Each semester, we showcase a Carleton faculty member whose academic interests complements one of our current exhibitions, and invite them to give a talk on their research.
Inspired by Sharon Hayes’ installations and video works that explore student activism in 1960s and 70s America in Sharon Hayes: Loudspeakers and Other Forms of Listening, this Lunchtime Lecture will feature Justin Paulson (Department of Sociology and Anthropology) speaking about his research on radical politics and social movement history.
Bring your lunch, the gallery will provide coffee and tea, and we’ll all learn something new! 
Justin Paulson teaches social theory and social movement history in the department of Sociology and Anthropology and in the Institute of Political Economy at Carleton.  His recent publications include “The Uneven Development of Radical Imagination” (Affinities 4:2), a rebuttal to “The Left After Politics” (Studies in Political Economy 89, co-authored with Rebecca Schein) and an edited collection, Capitalism and Confrontation (Red Quill).
Images: Student march in Ottawa against the Vietnam War, The Raven ’67 Yearbook, Carleton University Library Archives and Research Collections.
ZoomInfo
Upcoming Event at CUAG: CUAG Lunchtime Lecture: “Radical Politics and Forms of Listening”
Wednesday, 23 April at 12:15pm
Each semester, we showcase a Carleton faculty member whose academic interests complements one of our current exhibitions, and invite them to give a talk on their research.
Inspired by Sharon Hayes’ installations and video works that explore student activism in 1960s and 70s America in Sharon Hayes: Loudspeakers and Other Forms of Listening, this Lunchtime Lecture will feature Justin Paulson (Department of Sociology and Anthropology) speaking about his research on radical politics and social movement history.
Bring your lunch, the gallery will provide coffee and tea, and we’ll all learn something new! 
Justin Paulson teaches social theory and social movement history in the department of Sociology and Anthropology and in the Institute of Political Economy at Carleton.  His recent publications include “The Uneven Development of Radical Imagination” (Affinities 4:2), a rebuttal to “The Left After Politics” (Studies in Political Economy 89, co-authored with Rebecca Schein) and an edited collection, Capitalism and Confrontation (Red Quill).
Images: Student march in Ottawa against the Vietnam War, The Raven ’67 Yearbook, Carleton University Library Archives and Research Collections.
ZoomInfo

Upcoming Event at CUAG: CUAG Lunchtime Lecture: “Radical Politics and Forms of Listening”

Wednesday, 23 April at 12:15pm

Each semester, we showcase a Carleton faculty member whose academic interests complements one of our current exhibitions, and invite them to give a talk on their research.

Inspired by Sharon Hayes’ installations and video works that explore student activism in 1960s and 70s America in Sharon Hayes: Loudspeakers and Other Forms of Listening, this Lunchtime Lecture will feature Justin Paulson (Department of Sociology and Anthropology) speaking about his research on radical politics and social movement history.

Bring your lunch, the gallery will provide coffee and tea, and we’ll all learn something new!

Justin Paulson teaches social theory and social movement history in the department of Sociology and Anthropology and in the Institute of Political Economy at Carleton.  His recent publications include “The Uneven Development of Radical Imagination” (Affinities 4:2), a rebuttal to “The Left After Politics” (Studies in Political Economy 89, co-authored with Rebecca Schein) and an edited collection, Capitalism and Confrontation (Red Quill).

Images: Student march in Ottawa against the Vietnam War, The Raven ’67 Yearbook, Carleton University Library Archives and Research Collections.

6current exhibitions, medium,

On View: Sharon Hayes, Symbionese Liberation Army (SLA) Screeds #13, 16, 20, 29, 2003. 4 channel video installation. 
While an MFA student at UCLA, Hayes found a book that included transcripts of the four audiotapes that the radical Symbionese Liberation Army (SLA) had newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst record after they kidnapped her in 1974. The tapes, which the SLA sent to a local radio station over a four-month period, communicated their ransom demand that the Hearst family feed all the underprivileged people in California,  and addressed the family’s and FBI’s actions during the ordeal. In the last tape, Hearst famously renamed herself Tania and announced she was joining the SLA.
To make this work, Hayes performed and recorded a “re-speaking” of the transcripts over a period of several months. The four resulting videos tightly frame Hayes’ face, and we hear an off-camera audience correct or prompt her when she deviates from the transcripts. Hayes was intrigued by the tapes’ evidence of Hearst’s transformation during her four months of captivity. The distant look on the artist’s face, as she concentrates on reciting Hearst’s texts from memory and responds to the audience’s corrections, evokes Hearst’s indoctrination to SLA politics. Hayes was also interested by how Hearst, the later court case, was characterized as a young, easily impressionable university student who was susceptible to being transformed into a political radical.
Text by Heather Anderson. Bottom photo credit: Remi Theriault.
ZoomInfo
On View: Sharon Hayes, Symbionese Liberation Army (SLA) Screeds #13, 16, 20, 29, 2003. 4 channel video installation. 
While an MFA student at UCLA, Hayes found a book that included transcripts of the four audiotapes that the radical Symbionese Liberation Army (SLA) had newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst record after they kidnapped her in 1974. The tapes, which the SLA sent to a local radio station over a four-month period, communicated their ransom demand that the Hearst family feed all the underprivileged people in California,  and addressed the family’s and FBI’s actions during the ordeal. In the last tape, Hearst famously renamed herself Tania and announced she was joining the SLA.
To make this work, Hayes performed and recorded a “re-speaking” of the transcripts over a period of several months. The four resulting videos tightly frame Hayes’ face, and we hear an off-camera audience correct or prompt her when she deviates from the transcripts. Hayes was intrigued by the tapes’ evidence of Hearst’s transformation during her four months of captivity. The distant look on the artist’s face, as she concentrates on reciting Hearst’s texts from memory and responds to the audience’s corrections, evokes Hearst’s indoctrination to SLA politics. Hayes was also interested by how Hearst, the later court case, was characterized as a young, easily impressionable university student who was susceptible to being transformed into a political radical.
Text by Heather Anderson. Bottom photo credit: Remi Theriault.
ZoomInfo

On View: Sharon Hayes, Symbionese Liberation Army (SLA) Screeds #13, 16, 20, 29, 2003. 4 channel video installation.

While an MFA student at UCLA, Hayes found a book that included transcripts of the four audiotapes that the radical Symbionese Liberation Army (SLA) had newspaper heiress Patricia Hearst record after they kidnapped her in 1974. The tapes, which the SLA sent to a local radio station over a four-month period, communicated their ransom demand that the Hearst family feed all the underprivileged people in California,  and addressed the family’s and FBI’s actions during the ordeal. In the last tape, Hearst famously renamed herself Tania and announced she was joining the SLA.

To make this work, Hayes performed and recorded a “re-speaking” of the transcripts over a period of several months. The four resulting videos tightly frame Hayes’ face, and we hear an off-camera audience correct or prompt her when she deviates from the transcripts. Hayes was intrigued by the tapes’ evidence of Hearst’s transformation during her four months of captivity. The distant look on the artist’s face, as she concentrates on reciting Hearst’s texts from memory and responds to the audience’s corrections, evokes Hearst’s indoctrination to SLA politics. Hayes was also interested by how Hearst, the later court case, was characterized as a young, easily impressionable university student who was susceptible to being transformed into a political radical.

Text by Heather Anderson. Bottom photo credit: Remi Theriault.

6Sharon Hayes,

Collection Friday!
Mieke Bevelander, Untitled, 1991.
Oil stick on paper.
ZoomInfo
Camera
Canon EOS 30D
ISO
500
Aperture
f/6.3
Exposure
1/80th
Focal Length
63mm

Collection Friday!

Mieke Bevelander, Untitled, 1991.

Oil stick on paper.

6collection friday, Mieke Bevelander, medium,

Ottawa Art Scene: April 10 - 16

Tonight, Montreal artist Kai McCall has a solo show opening at Galerie St. Laurent + Hall in the Market. Check out his painted portraits of people in imaginary scenarios - from gun-toting revolutionaries on motorcycles to bespectacled young men in the woods.

On Friday night, La Petite Mort has a special exhibition for us called “UP / DOWN / CHARM / STRANGE / TOP / BOTTOM”, a group exhibition of works by artists from the Mexico City-based collective, La Trampa Gráfica Contemporánea. One of the artists was included in last summer’s Sakahan exhibition at the NGC, and now returns to Ottawa for this group exhibition.

This weekend, you can check out two new art exhibitions at the War Museum that present artistic representations of world wars. Witness: Canadian Art of the First World War is a group exhibition by artists like AY Jackson and Frederick Varley. I’m particularly interested in seeing sketches done in the trenches and POW camps. The other exhibition, Transformations: AY Jackson and Otto Dix, shows the impact that the war had on these two artists (one Canadian and one German) in their later work. 

To complete your weekend of art, Westboro’s Cube Gallery has organized the exhibition 3 by 3: Cowen, Thauberger, and Yuristy, featuring panorama paintings by three esteemed Canadian artists, Jack Cowin, David Thauberger and Russell Yuristy. The official vernssage is on Sunday, so spend your day walking down Wellington and pop by!

6ottarts,

Upcoming Event: Exhibition Tour and Workshop with Patrick Lacasse and Alisdair McRae

This isn’t technically a CUAG event, but both Patrick and Alisdair are part of the CUAG family, so I think it counts! Check out this cool video of their exhibition, and don’t forget to come to their artist talk and workshop on Sunday!

On View: Dennis Tourbin, 1984, A Painted History, 1984-85. 1 - 36 of a series of 120. Watercolour on paper. Collection of Nadia Laham.
While in Paris through a Canada Council for the Arts residency in 1982, Tourbin’s approach to painting underwent a dramatic shift as he experimented with watercolours in place of acrylics and began incorporating images into his paintings.
Trading lightly structured lines of text for loose, collage-inspired compositions, Tourbin began painting the fragments he tore from newspapers and magazines, rather than simply employing the shape as a framing device for his poems. He meticulously replicated the varied fonts of international news headlines alongside photographs, postcards of masterworks from museums, and ephemera like transit transfers and postmarked stamps.
In 1984, Tourbin embarked on this series of 120 watercolours, documenting the events of the year through words and images by combining international headlines with elements of personal significance. Though Tourbin would later return to acrylics, this approach to form and composition would remain at the heart of his work through the rest of his career.
You can check out this work in Dennis Tourbin: The Language of Visual Poetry, on now until April 27th!
ZoomInfo
Camera
Canon PowerShot G10
ISO
200
Aperture
f/3.2
Exposure
1/15th
Focal Length
46mm

On View: Dennis Tourbin, 1984, A Painted History, 1984-85. 1 - 36 of a series of 120. Watercolour on paper. Collection of Nadia Laham.

While in Paris through a Canada Council for the Arts residency in 1982, Tourbin’s approach to painting underwent a dramatic shift as he experimented with watercolours in place of acrylics and began incorporating images into his paintings.

Trading lightly structured lines of text for loose, collage-inspired compositions, Tourbin began painting the fragments he tore from newspapers and magazines, rather than simply employing the shape as a framing device for his poems. He meticulously replicated the varied fonts of international news headlines alongside photographs, postcards of masterworks from museums, and ephemera like transit transfers and postmarked stamps.

In 1984, Tourbin embarked on this series of 120 watercolours, documenting the events of the year through words and images by combining international headlines with elements of personal significance. Though Tourbin would later return to acrylics, this approach to form and composition would remain at the heart of his work through the rest of his career.

You can check out this work in Dennis Tourbin: The Language of Visual Poetry, on now until April 27th!

6current exhibitions, Dennis Tourbin, medium,

-