Ottawa Art Scene: April 4 - 9

Last week, I recommended the Rodin/Claudel ballet at the NAC, and this week, the creative couple comes up again, as the Carleton Film Department will be showing Camille Claudel 1915 tonight as part of their new film festival. It’s a fantastic line-up (and free!), so be sure to check out some of the screenings.

All weekend, the Carleton Fieldhouse will be taken over by the Ottawa Antique Show. Tons of amazing pieces - including art - to buy (or more likely, browse). Carleton students, staff, and faculty get in for free so take advantage!

Have you been to visit Gallery 101’s new space in Little Italy? Their new exhibition, Turning the Page, celebrates the next step in the artist-run centre’s history, and includes a bunch of cool events this month.

And don’t forget to come to CUAG’s last DOUBLE MAJOR of the season. One of our featured speakers, Ainsley Walton, will be talking about her job as a new media art conservator at the National Gallery of Canada. Should be really fascinating!

6ottarts,

Upcoming event at CUAG: DOUBLE MAJOR// April Edition: New Media Art Conservation + Introverts

This is a great graphic from Buzzfeed that maps an introvert’s brain. Want to learn more? Join us next Tuesday for our last DOUBLE MAJOR of the season: “New Media Art Conservation + Introverts”. Carleton Psychology professor John Zelenski will be sharing his research on happiness and the introvert brain.

6ottarts, medium,

On View: Sharon Hayes, Sarah H. Gordon’s Strike Journal, May 1970, 2012. 2 double-LP record sets; silkscreened album cover and turntables, 75 minutes, edition of 5 + 4 AP
During Hayes’ research in teh archives of Smith College (in Massachusetts), she encountered a journal written by Sarah Gordon: a young students’s reflection on her experience of a 1970 student strike protesting the Vietname War, racism, and the May 4, 1970 National Guard killings at Kent State University. Hayes approached Gordon, now a scholar of American history and professor at Connecticut’s Quinnipiac University, who agreed to record a reading of her journal. This led to a set of LPs designed and pressed by Hayes, which can be played by exhibition visitors. 
Gordon’s journal chronicles the mundane details of organizing the strike, as well as the questions she had in committing to a collective political position. These aspects are often overlooked in historical accounts of the 1970 student movement, which are clouded by nostalgia for the activism of the period. Gordon’s voice registers the lengthy gap separating her 1970 journal and her 2012 reading, complicating the transmission of an “authentic” witness to history. Gordon’s “re-speaking” of her journal elaborates Hayes’ interest in embodied speech, the tensions between the personal and the political, and the role of the university and a community of peers play in shaping one’s identity.
Check out this piece in Sharon Hayes: Loudspeakers and Other Forms of Listening, on now until April 27th.
Image: Sharon Hayes (in collaboration with Sarah Gordon), Sarah H. Gordon’s Strike Journal, May 1970 (2012). 2 double-LP record sets; silkscreened album cover and turntables, 75 minutes, edition of 5 + 4 AP and Andrea Geyer and Sharon Hayes, Space-Set/Set-Space (2012/2014). Plywood, lumber, MDF, hardware, carpet, and paint. Courtesy of the artists and Galerie Thomas Zander, Cologne and Tanya Leighton Gallery, Berlin. Photograph by Rémi Thériault.
ZoomInfo
Camera
Canon EOS 5D Mark II
ISO
800
Aperture
f/5.6
Exposure
1/8th
Focal Length
34mm

On View: Sharon Hayes, Sarah H. Gordon’s Strike Journal, May 1970, 2012. 2 double-LP record sets; silkscreened album cover and turntables, 75 minutes, edition of 5 + 4 AP

During Hayes’ research in teh archives of Smith College (in Massachusetts), she encountered a journal written by Sarah Gordon: a young students’s reflection on her experience of a 1970 student strike protesting the Vietname War, racism, and the May 4, 1970 National Guard killings at Kent State University. Hayes approached Gordon, now a scholar of American history and professor at Connecticut’s Quinnipiac University, who agreed to record a reading of her journal. This led to a set of LPs designed and pressed by Hayes, which can be played by exhibition visitors. 

Gordon’s journal chronicles the mundane details of organizing the strike, as well as the questions she had in committing to a collective political position. These aspects are often overlooked in historical accounts of the 1970 student movement, which are clouded by nostalgia for the activism of the period. Gordon’s voice registers the lengthy gap separating her 1970 journal and her 2012 reading, complicating the transmission of an “authentic” witness to history. Gordon’s “re-speaking” of her journal elaborates Hayes’ interest in embodied speech, the tensions between the personal and the political, and the role of the university and a community of peers play in shaping one’s identity.

Check out this piece in Sharon Hayes: Loudspeakers and Other Forms of Listening, on now until April 27th.

Image: Sharon Hayes (in collaboration with Sarah Gordon), Sarah H. Gordon’s Strike Journal, May 1970 (2012). 2 double-LP record sets; silkscreened album cover and turntables, 75 minutes, edition of 5 + 4 AP and Andrea Geyer and Sharon Hayes, Space-Set/Set-Space (2012/2014). Plywood, lumber, MDF, hardware, carpet, and paint. Courtesy of the artists and Galerie Thomas Zander, Cologne and Tanya Leighton Gallery, Berlin. Photograph by Rémi Thériault.

6Sharon Hayes, medium,

Classic Paintings, Explained With Tweets, Status Updates, and Emojis | Summer Evening by Edward Hopper, from Emoji-Nation Part Two image Courtesy Nastya Ptichek | WIRED.com

Source: Wired

6medium,

Collection Friday!
Tony Tascona, A Northern Experience, 1998.
Silkscreen on embossed paper.
ZoomInfo
Camera
Canon EOS 30D
ISO
500
Aperture
f/11
Exposure
1/125th
Focal Length
54mm

Collection Friday!

Tony Tascona, A Northern Experience, 1998.

Silkscreen on embossed paper.

6Collection Friday, Tony Tascona, medium,

Ottawa Art Scene: March 27 - April 2

Tonight is the opening reception for the exhibition honouring all the 2014 recipients of the Canada Council Governor-General Awards in Visual and Media Arts. Head to the National Gallery of Canada for some wine, fancy cheese, and have a look at some incredible work by the honorees, including Ottawa artist Carol Wainio and beloved NGC curator Brydon Smith.

Though technically not a visual art event, the NAC is hosting Les Grands Ballets Canadiens de Montreal production of Rodin/Claudel, the story of sculptor Auguste Rodin and his lover, studio assistant, muse (and sculptor in her own right), Camille Claudel. Performances are happening tonight, tomorrow, and Saturday night, and there are Live Rush tickets available for students, so take advantage!

GuerillaCRAWL continues this week, with a few more events to celebrate their 10th Anniversary publication. On Friday night, SPAO’s annual Print Sale is happening, where you can get prints by great local photographers like Rémi Thériault and Whitney Lewis-Smith, as well as a special portfolio of beautiful photographs by Franz Rosenbaum, who was known for his portraits of jazz musicians.

Then, on Saturday night, the official launch of Guerilla Mag’s special edition publication will take place at Gallery 101’s new location. A big celebration of Ottawa creativity, the night will feature tons of music and performances. Also pizza.

Arts Court once again plays host to Art Battle - Ottawa on Saturday night, where local artists participate in a live painting competition, with the audience deciding the winner by vote. These events are super popular and should be a really exciting night! Also - student discount!

6ottarts,

Join us this afternoon for two special talks on “Art & Trauma: Questions of Authenticity”, presented by Carleton’s Institute for Comparative Studies in Art, Culture, and Literature and The Centre for Transnational Cultural Analysis.

The photo above shows part of Walid Raad’s installation at Documenta 13, which evolved around the (art) history of the Arab world, its present and future, and oscillates between fact and fiction, documentation and interpretation. Carleton PhD candidate Johnny Alam will be addressing trauma theory and false memory in the work of this Lebanese contemporary artist.

You can check out more photos of the installation here and join us at 4:30 to hear from Johnny!

Spending way too much time this morning browsing through the National Film Board Still Image Division archives at Library & Archives Canada online (Search Reference # R1196-14-7-E for all NFB images).

Check out this photograph from World War II, captioned “Cecilia Butler, former night club singer and dancer now employed as a reamer in the Small Arms Ltd. Section of the John Inglis Company munitions plant,” Toronto, December 1943.” The photo is uncredited.

For more, come to Carol Payne’s talk TONIGHT at the Sunnyside Public Library, where she’ll be talking about the NFB Still Image Division, and it’s place in the construction of Canadian national identity.

6Canada, photography, NFB, medium,

Collection Friday!

Josie Pamiutu Papialuk, Happily He Remembers All His Other Springtimes , 1987. Stonecut on paper.

Plus a concrete poem for World Poetry Day (in honour of Dennis Tourbin’s visual poetry):

[in Just-] by e.e. cummings
in Just-
spring          when the world is mud-

luscious the little
lame balloonman

whistles          far          and wee
and eddieandbill come

running from marbles and
piracies and it’s

spring
when the world is puddle-wonderful

the queer
old balloonman whistles

far          and             wee
and bettyandisbel come dancing

from hop-scotch and jump-rope and
it’s

spring
and

         the
                  goat-footed

balloonMan          whistles
far

and
wee

6Spring, World Poetry Day, Josie Pamiutu Papialuk, medium,

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