Upcoming Event at CUAG: Making Otherwise Artists in Conversation 
Tuesday, 13 May, 2014 at 7 p.m.
Join us for a public conversation with artists from “Making Otherwise: Craft and Material Fluency in Contemporary Art.” Curator Heather Anderson will be talking with Richard Boulet, Marc Courtemanche, Sarah Maloney, and Paul Mathieu about their artistic practice, “reskilling” and the handmade, and the use of craft in contemporary art as a way of making differently or “otherwise.”
Click through for more info on the artists.
Image: Paul Mathieu, Odalisque Bowl, Ian/Edouard (2008). Porcelain.
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Upcoming Event at CUAG: Making Otherwise Artists in Conversation

Tuesday, 13 May, 2014 at 7 p.m.

Join us for a public conversation with artists from “Making Otherwise: Craft and Material Fluency in Contemporary Art.” Curator Heather Anderson will be talking with Richard Boulet, Marc Courtemanche, Sarah Maloney, and Paul Mathieu about their artistic practice, “reskilling” and the handmade, and the use of craft in contemporary art as a way of making differently or “otherwise.”

Click through for more info on the artists.

Image: Paul Mathieu, Odalisque Bowl, Ian/Edouard (2008). Porcelain.

6Making Otherwise, Paul Mathieu,

CUAG is right in the middle of installing our summer exhibitions Making Otherwise: Craft and Material Fluency in Contemporary Art and Inuit Art: Skin Deep. You can check out how Marc Courtemanche’s installation, The Studio (2008/2014) will transform the High Gallery, as well as some of the beautiful seal skin objects that will be on display for Inuit Art: Skin Deep. 
Join us on Monday, 12 May for the official opening reception!
ZoomInfo
CUAG is right in the middle of installing our summer exhibitions Making Otherwise: Craft and Material Fluency in Contemporary Art and Inuit Art: Skin Deep. You can check out how Marc Courtemanche’s installation, The Studio (2008/2014) will transform the High Gallery, as well as some of the beautiful seal skin objects that will be on display for Inuit Art: Skin Deep. 
Join us on Monday, 12 May for the official opening reception!
ZoomInfo
CUAG is right in the middle of installing our summer exhibitions Making Otherwise: Craft and Material Fluency in Contemporary Art and Inuit Art: Skin Deep. You can check out how Marc Courtemanche’s installation, The Studio (2008/2014) will transform the High Gallery, as well as some of the beautiful seal skin objects that will be on display for Inuit Art: Skin Deep. 
Join us on Monday, 12 May for the official opening reception!
ZoomInfo
CUAG is right in the middle of installing our summer exhibitions Making Otherwise: Craft and Material Fluency in Contemporary Art and Inuit Art: Skin Deep. You can check out how Marc Courtemanche’s installation, The Studio (2008/2014) will transform the High Gallery, as well as some of the beautiful seal skin objects that will be on display for Inuit Art: Skin Deep. 
Join us on Monday, 12 May for the official opening reception!
ZoomInfo
CUAG is right in the middle of installing our summer exhibitions Making Otherwise: Craft and Material Fluency in Contemporary Art and Inuit Art: Skin Deep. You can check out how Marc Courtemanche’s installation, The Studio (2008/2014) will transform the High Gallery, as well as some of the beautiful seal skin objects that will be on display for Inuit Art: Skin Deep. 
Join us on Monday, 12 May for the official opening reception!
ZoomInfo
CUAG is right in the middle of installing our summer exhibitions Making Otherwise: Craft and Material Fluency in Contemporary Art and Inuit Art: Skin Deep. You can check out how Marc Courtemanche’s installation, The Studio (2008/2014) will transform the High Gallery, as well as some of the beautiful seal skin objects that will be on display for Inuit Art: Skin Deep. 
Join us on Monday, 12 May for the official opening reception!
ZoomInfo
CUAG is right in the middle of installing our summer exhibitions Making Otherwise: Craft and Material Fluency in Contemporary Art and Inuit Art: Skin Deep. You can check out how Marc Courtemanche’s installation, The Studio (2008/2014) will transform the High Gallery, as well as some of the beautiful seal skin objects that will be on display for Inuit Art: Skin Deep. 
Join us on Monday, 12 May for the official opening reception!
ZoomInfo

CUAG is right in the middle of installing our summer exhibitions Making Otherwise: Craft and Material Fluency in Contemporary Art and Inuit Art: Skin Deep. You can check out how Marc Courtemanche’s installation, The Studio (2008/2014) will transform the High Gallery, as well as some of the beautiful seal skin objects that will be on display for Inuit Art: Skin Deep.

Join us on Monday, 12 May for the official opening reception!

Collection Friday!
Robert Savoie, Cozumel, 1976
Etching on paper, edition 48/50.
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Canon EOS 5D Mark II
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200
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f/9
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1/2th
Focal Length
100mm

Collection Friday!

Robert Savoie, Cozumel, 1976

Etching on paper, edition 48/50.

6Collection Friday, Robert Savoie, medium,

Ottawa Art Scene: May 1 - 7

Tonight is another Free Thursday at the National Gallery of Canada, and there is a special lecture by Spanish scholar Fernando Marías called El Greco: does he need a new history? Although he was an artist during the Spanish Renaissance, the Crete-born (hence the name) El Greco’s style was totally unique - elongated figures, dramatic lighting and colour - and really only gained appreciation in the twentieth century. This should be a fascinating talk!

A new Herman Ruhland show opens at La Petite Mort on Friday night featuring new sculptures by the Dutch-born, Ottawa-based artist. His sculptures explore the imagined limits of the figure form, and are created using materials like wood and scrap metal. The exhibition is on for a month, but the opening parties are always a blast, so be sure to stop in.

Another exhibition celebrating Ottawa artists opens at Patrick Gordon Framing on Friday evening. Today and Yesterday presents works by impressive Ottawa artists like Gerald Trottier, Duncan de Kergommeaux and Sharon Craig.

On Saturday night, there’s quite a cool collaborative event happening at St. Luke’s, presented by the Ottawa International Animation Festival, City of Ottawa Community Arts and Social Engagement and the Canadian Film Institute. Montreal animator Theodore Ushev and Ottawa musician Michael Dubue (of the Hilotrons) will be doing a improvised animation and musical performance. Definitely worth checking out.

On Wednesday, head to the south end of the city for the opening of  Andrew Smith: Warning Signs at Patrick Mikhail. Smith’s abstract paintings are full of motion, something he sees as central to the making and viewing of a painting.

Happy May Day, everyone!

6ottawa art scene,

Collection Friday!
Ruth Annaqtuusi Tulurialik, Untitled, 1997. Coloured pencil on paper.
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Nikon D300
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f/20
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1/125th
Focal Length
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Collection Friday!

Ruth Annaqtuusi Tulurialik, Untitled, 1997. Coloured pencil on paper.

6Collection Friday, medium,

Ottawa Art Scene: April 24 - 30

Our winter exhibitions close on Sunday, so if you haven’t had a chance to see Sharon Hayes: Loudspeakers and Other Forms of Listening and Dennis Tourbin: The Language of Visual Poetry, be sure to check them out. Maybe on the rainy Saturday this weekend?

Make a gallery-going day of it, and also check out the two new solo shows that opened at AXENEO7 this week. The Daniel Barrow exhibition includes The Thief of Mirrors, a monologue and vignettes that take place between media, combining pre-recorded sound and imagery with live voice, live or pre-recorded music and projection. His drawings, shown on overhead projections, are unforgettable. French artist Ingrid Luche’s installations take the gallery space as a starting point, using food and travel imagery to explore memory and deja vu. 

Starting on Friday, the graduating class from University of Ottawa Bachelor of Fine Arts program will be displaying their work around campus in their final exhibition, Preface 2014. The vernissage is Friday evening, so go check out some emerging Ottawa artists and congratulate them!

On Sunday, there is an artist talk by the great Ed Pien at the Ottawa School of Art Orleans campus. Pien’s drawings and delicate cut-outs are incredible, and he will also be giving a demonstration of his technique. The talk is in conjunction with the exhibition Ed Pien: Compelled, which will be on display until the beginning of June.

Lots of students are finished their exams and handed in their final papers, so there will be lots of celebrating this weekend. Let me know what I’ve missed!

What else are you looking forward to this weekend in the Ottawa art world?

6ottarts,

Upcoming Exhibition at CUAG: Inuit Art: Skin Deep

Curated by Lisa Truong

May 12 - August 10, 2014

Skin Deep explores the enormous importance of skins and skin clothing in Inuit culture, past and present. In Inuit narratives, skin is something that can be worn, shed, and manipulated. People tattoo their own skin to affirm personal and cultural identities, and wear clothing made from animal skins for aesthetic adornment and protection from the elements. Skin Deep features the tools used to hunt animals and prepare their skins; prints, drawings, and sculptures depicting stories and objects in which skin plays a central role; and objects made from skin, such as mitts and boots. The exhibition includes the work of artists like Ningeokuluk Teevee, Jessie Oonark, Arnaqu Ashevak, and Helen Kalvak.

Image: Jessie Oonark (1906 – 1985), Tattooed Faces (1960). Stonecut on paper, ed. 9/50, Carleton University Art Gallery: Gift of Drew and Carolle Anne Armour, 2009. Photo by Patrick Lacasse.

6Inuit Art, medium,

Upcoming Exhibition at CUAG: Imaginary Worlds: Scottie Wilson and “Art Brut”

Curated by Pauline Goutain and Jill Carrick

May 12 - September 07. 2014
Scottie Wilson (whose real name was Louis Freeman) is considered to be one of the most important “outsider” artists in Europe. Born in Glasgow around 1890, he immigrated in the 1930s to Toronto, where he worked as a second-hand-goods merchant.

At the age of forty, it is claimed, he “suddenly” began to draw, without any artistic training, using a pen and coloured inks. With these simple tools, “Scottie” built a visual world situated between dream and reality, where human, vegetal and architectural realms overlap. The complex web of forms and hatchings in his drawings depicts a mysterious decorative universe.

First recognized in Canada by the important collector Douglas Duncan and exhibited in Duncan’s Toronto gallery, The Picture Loan Society, alongside such artists as David Milne and Carl Schaefer, Scottie Wilson later experienced a second—and quite different —kind of recognition in Europe.

In 1945, following his return to London, the Surrealists acclaimed his work. André Breton brought Wilson to Jean Dubuffet’s attention. Dubuffet, a French painter who had recently coined the term art brut (“raw” or “rough” art) to denote artworks made by self-taught individuals, was fascinated by Scottie Wilson’s imaginative vision and unusual personality. For Dubuffet, his works were “uncultivated” and “spontaneous.” He pronounced Wilson a typical maker of art brut, and purchased his work.
Exhibitions in Canada of Scottie Wilson’s work have tended to focus on his Canadian output rather than his association with art brut. This exhibition instead examines the way he has been appreciated in Europe. It brings together two imaginary worlds: Scottie’s fantastic drawings and Dubuffet’s essentialist phantasm of art brut. 
Image: Robert “Scottie” Wilson (1888/90-1972), Untitled (Far Eastern Town) [detail], date unknown. Ink and coloured pencil over graphite on paper. Carleton University Art Gallery: Bequest of Frances Barwick to the Department of Art History, Carleton University; transferred to the University Art Collection, 1988. Photo by Justin Wonnacott.
ZoomInfo
Camera
Canon EOS 5D Mark II
ISO
200
Aperture
f/9
Exposure
1/2th
Focal Length
100mm

Upcoming Exhibition at CUAG: Imaginary Worlds: Scottie Wilson and “Art Brut”

Curated by Pauline Goutain and Jill Carrick

May 12 - September 07. 2014

Scottie Wilson (whose real name was Louis Freeman) is considered to be one of the most important “outsider” artists in Europe. Born in Glasgow around 1890, he immigrated in the 1930s to Toronto, where he worked as a second-hand-goods merchant.

At the age of forty, it is claimed, he “suddenly” began to draw, without any artistic training, using a pen and coloured inks. With these simple tools, “Scottie” built a visual world situated between dream and reality, where human, vegetal and architectural realms overlap. The complex web of forms and hatchings in his drawings depicts a mysterious decorative universe.

First recognized in Canada by the important collector Douglas Duncan and exhibited in Duncan’s Toronto gallery, The Picture Loan Society, alongside such artists as David Milne and Carl Schaefer, Scottie Wilson later experienced a second—and quite different —kind of recognition in Europe.

In 1945, following his return to London, the Surrealists acclaimed his work. André Breton brought Wilson to Jean Dubuffet’s attention. Dubuffet, a French painter who had recently coined the term art brut (“raw” or “rough” art) to denote artworks made by self-taught individuals, was fascinated by Scottie Wilson’s imaginative vision and unusual personality. For Dubuffet, his works were “uncultivated” and “spontaneous.” He pronounced Wilson a typical maker of art brut, and purchased his work.

Exhibitions in Canada of Scottie Wilson’s work have tended to focus on his Canadian output rather than his association with art brut. This exhibition instead examines the way he has been appreciated in Europe. It brings together two imaginary worlds: Scottie’s fantastic drawings and Dubuffet’s essentialist phantasm of art brut. 

Image: Robert “Scottie” Wilson (1888/90-1972), Untitled (Far Eastern Town) [detail], date unknown. Ink and coloured pencil over graphite on paper. Carleton University Art Gallery: Bequest of Frances Barwick to the Department of Art History, Carleton University; transferred to the University Art Collection, 1988. Photo by Justin Wonnacott.

6Art brut, Scottie Wilson, medium,

Upcoming Exhibition at CUAG: Making Otherwise: Craft and Material Fluency in Contemporary Art

Curated by Heather Anderson

May 12 - September 14. 2014

Today, there is an increasing permeability between the realms of “craft” and “art” occurring in step with an emphasis on “reskilling” and the handmade, as seen in contemporary art practice and in the widespread interest in all things handcrafted. Making Otherwise presents the work of six Canadian artists who merge the material and conceptual approaches of craft and art: Richard Boulet (Edmonton), Ursula Johnson (Eskasoni, NS), Marc Courtemanche (L’Ange-Gardien, QC), Paul Mathieu (Vancouver), Sarah Maloney (Halifax), and Janet Morton (Guelph). Drawing on their fluency in ceramics, basket weaving, furniture making, stitchery, bronze casting, woodworking, and knitting, these artists think through materials, forms, and ideas to make things differently or “otherwise.”

Image: Robert Boulet, Room Four [detail](2013). Fabric quilting with applique, cross-stitch.

6Robert Boulet, craft, quilt, medium,

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