Ottawa Art Scene: April 10 - 16

Tonight, Montreal artist Kai McCall has a solo show opening at Galerie St. Laurent + Hall in the Market. Check out his painted portraits of people in imaginary scenarios - from gun-toting revolutionaries on motorcycles to bespectacled young men in the woods.

On Friday night, La Petite Mort has a special exhibition for us called “UP / DOWN / CHARM / STRANGE / TOP / BOTTOM”, a group exhibition of works by artists from the Mexico City-based collective, La Trampa Gráfica Contemporánea. One of the artists was included in last summer’s Sakahan exhibition at the NGC, and now returns to Ottawa for this group exhibition.

This weekend, you can check out two new art exhibitions at the War Museum that present artistic representations of world wars. Witness: Canadian Art of the First World War is a group exhibition by artists like AY Jackson and Frederick Varley. I’m particularly interested in seeing sketches done in the trenches and POW camps. The other exhibition, Transformations: AY Jackson and Otto Dix, shows the impact that the war had on these two artists (one Canadian and one German) in their later work. 

To complete your weekend of art, Westboro’s Cube Gallery has organized the exhibition 3 by 3: Cowen, Thauberger, and Yuristy, featuring panorama paintings by three esteemed Canadian artists, Jack Cowin, David Thauberger and Russell Yuristy. The official vernssage is on Sunday, so spend your day walking down Wellington and pop by!

6ottarts,

Upcoming Event: Exhibition Tour and Workshop with Patrick Lacasse and Alisdair McRae

This isn’t technically a CUAG event, but both Patrick and Alisdair are part of the CUAG family, so I think it counts! Check out this cool video of their exhibition, and don’t forget to come to their artist talk and workshop on Sunday!

On View: Dennis Tourbin, 1984, A Painted History, 1984-85. 1 - 36 of a series of 120. Watercolour on paper. Collection of Nadia Laham.
While in Paris through a Canada Council for the Arts residency in 1982, Tourbin’s approach to painting underwent a dramatic shift as he experimented with watercolours in place of acrylics and began incorporating images into his paintings.
Trading lightly structured lines of text for loose, collage-inspired compositions, Tourbin began painting the fragments he tore from newspapers and magazines, rather than simply employing the shape as a framing device for his poems. He meticulously replicated the varied fonts of international news headlines alongside photographs, postcards of masterworks from museums, and ephemera like transit transfers and postmarked stamps.
In 1984, Tourbin embarked on this series of 120 watercolours, documenting the events of the year through words and images by combining international headlines with elements of personal significance. Though Tourbin would later return to acrylics, this approach to form and composition would remain at the heart of his work through the rest of his career.
You can check out this work in Dennis Tourbin: The Language of Visual Poetry, on now until April 27th!
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Canon PowerShot G10
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200
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On View: Dennis Tourbin, 1984, A Painted History, 1984-85. 1 - 36 of a series of 120. Watercolour on paper. Collection of Nadia Laham.

While in Paris through a Canada Council for the Arts residency in 1982, Tourbin’s approach to painting underwent a dramatic shift as he experimented with watercolours in place of acrylics and began incorporating images into his paintings.

Trading lightly structured lines of text for loose, collage-inspired compositions, Tourbin began painting the fragments he tore from newspapers and magazines, rather than simply employing the shape as a framing device for his poems. He meticulously replicated the varied fonts of international news headlines alongside photographs, postcards of masterworks from museums, and ephemera like transit transfers and postmarked stamps.

In 1984, Tourbin embarked on this series of 120 watercolours, documenting the events of the year through words and images by combining international headlines with elements of personal significance. Though Tourbin would later return to acrylics, this approach to form and composition would remain at the heart of his work through the rest of his career.

You can check out this work in Dennis Tourbin: The Language of Visual Poetry, on now until April 27th!

6current exhibitions, Dennis Tourbin, medium,

Collection Friday!
Rene Morris, Untitled, 2000. Acrylic on canvas.
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Canon EOS 30D
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640
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1/40th
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46mm

Collection Friday!

Rene Morris, Untitled, 2000. Acrylic on canvas.

6collection friday, Rene Morris, medium,

Ottawa Art Scene: April 4 - 9

Last week, I recommended the Rodin/Claudel ballet at the NAC, and this week, the creative couple comes up again, as the Carleton Film Department will be showing Camille Claudel 1915 tonight as part of their new film festival. It’s a fantastic line-up (and free!), so be sure to check out some of the screenings.

All weekend, the Carleton Fieldhouse will be taken over by the Ottawa Antique Show. Tons of amazing pieces - including art - to buy (or more likely, browse). Carleton students, staff, and faculty get in for free so take advantage!

Have you been to visit Gallery 101’s new space in Little Italy? Their new exhibition, Turning the Page, celebrates the next step in the artist-run centre’s history, and includes a bunch of cool events this month.

And don’t forget to come to CUAG’s last DOUBLE MAJOR of the season. One of our featured speakers, Ainsley Walton, will be talking about her job as a new media art conservator at the National Gallery of Canada. Should be really fascinating!

6ottarts,

Upcoming event at CUAG: DOUBLE MAJOR// April Edition: New Media Art Conservation + Introverts

This is a great graphic from Buzzfeed that maps an introvert’s brain. Want to learn more? Join us next Tuesday for our last DOUBLE MAJOR of the season: “New Media Art Conservation + Introverts”. Carleton Psychology professor John Zelenski will be sharing his research on happiness and the introvert brain.

6ottarts, medium,

On View: Sharon Hayes, Sarah H. Gordon’s Strike Journal, May 1970, 2012. 2 double-LP record sets; silkscreened album cover and turntables, 75 minutes, edition of 5 + 4 AP
During Hayes’ research in teh archives of Smith College (in Massachusetts), she encountered a journal written by Sarah Gordon: a young students’s reflection on her experience of a 1970 student strike protesting the Vietname War, racism, and the May 4, 1970 National Guard killings at Kent State University. Hayes approached Gordon, now a scholar of American history and professor at Connecticut’s Quinnipiac University, who agreed to record a reading of her journal. This led to a set of LPs designed and pressed by Hayes, which can be played by exhibition visitors. 
Gordon’s journal chronicles the mundane details of organizing the strike, as well as the questions she had in committing to a collective political position. These aspects are often overlooked in historical accounts of the 1970 student movement, which are clouded by nostalgia for the activism of the period. Gordon’s voice registers the lengthy gap separating her 1970 journal and her 2012 reading, complicating the transmission of an “authentic” witness to history. Gordon’s “re-speaking” of her journal elaborates Hayes’ interest in embodied speech, the tensions between the personal and the political, and the role of the university and a community of peers play in shaping one’s identity.
Check out this piece in Sharon Hayes: Loudspeakers and Other Forms of Listening, on now until April 27th.
Image: Sharon Hayes (in collaboration with Sarah Gordon), Sarah H. Gordon’s Strike Journal, May 1970 (2012). 2 double-LP record sets; silkscreened album cover and turntables, 75 minutes, edition of 5 + 4 AP and Andrea Geyer and Sharon Hayes, Space-Set/Set-Space (2012/2014). Plywood, lumber, MDF, hardware, carpet, and paint. Courtesy of the artists and Galerie Thomas Zander, Cologne and Tanya Leighton Gallery, Berlin. Photograph by Rémi Thériault.
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Canon EOS 5D Mark II
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800
Aperture
f/5.6
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On View: Sharon Hayes, Sarah H. Gordon’s Strike Journal, May 1970, 2012. 2 double-LP record sets; silkscreened album cover and turntables, 75 minutes, edition of 5 + 4 AP

During Hayes’ research in teh archives of Smith College (in Massachusetts), she encountered a journal written by Sarah Gordon: a young students’s reflection on her experience of a 1970 student strike protesting the Vietname War, racism, and the May 4, 1970 National Guard killings at Kent State University. Hayes approached Gordon, now a scholar of American history and professor at Connecticut’s Quinnipiac University, who agreed to record a reading of her journal. This led to a set of LPs designed and pressed by Hayes, which can be played by exhibition visitors. 

Gordon’s journal chronicles the mundane details of organizing the strike, as well as the questions she had in committing to a collective political position. These aspects are often overlooked in historical accounts of the 1970 student movement, which are clouded by nostalgia for the activism of the period. Gordon’s voice registers the lengthy gap separating her 1970 journal and her 2012 reading, complicating the transmission of an “authentic” witness to history. Gordon’s “re-speaking” of her journal elaborates Hayes’ interest in embodied speech, the tensions between the personal and the political, and the role of the university and a community of peers play in shaping one’s identity.

Check out this piece in Sharon Hayes: Loudspeakers and Other Forms of Listening, on now until April 27th.

Image: Sharon Hayes (in collaboration with Sarah Gordon), Sarah H. Gordon’s Strike Journal, May 1970 (2012). 2 double-LP record sets; silkscreened album cover and turntables, 75 minutes, edition of 5 + 4 AP and Andrea Geyer and Sharon Hayes, Space-Set/Set-Space (2012/2014). Plywood, lumber, MDF, hardware, carpet, and paint. Courtesy of the artists and Galerie Thomas Zander, Cologne and Tanya Leighton Gallery, Berlin. Photograph by Rémi Thériault.

6Sharon Hayes, medium,

Classic Paintings, Explained With Tweets, Status Updates, and Emojis | Summer Evening by Edward Hopper, from Emoji-Nation Part Two image Courtesy Nastya Ptichek | WIRED.com

Source: Wired

6medium,

Collection Friday!
Tony Tascona, A Northern Experience, 1998.
Silkscreen on embossed paper.
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Canon EOS 30D
ISO
500
Aperture
f/11
Exposure
1/125th
Focal Length
54mm

Collection Friday!

Tony Tascona, A Northern Experience, 1998.

Silkscreen on embossed paper.

6Collection Friday, Tony Tascona, medium,

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