Posts tagged ottarts

Ottawa Art Scene: April 17 - 23

Since it’s a long weekend coming up, there are not a lot of events happening (though there are some great concerts and non-visual arts events happening, like this record swap at Raw Sugar!)

Most art galleries (including us!) will be open on Saturday and Sunday, so why not spend some time checking out exhibitions around town? Dennis Tourbin and Sharon Hayes are only up for another couple of weeks, there’s a new Gerald Trottier exhibition at the Ottawa Art Gallery ART Rental and Sales Gallery, and the National Gallery always has fun exhibitions to explore (I haven’t seen the Fischli & Weiss film yet).

In the west end, pair gallery visits with delicious food: you can check out Orange Art Gallery’s new space in the City Centre complex, right next to Art-is-in Bakery, or get a soup and sandwich at Thyme & Again before seeing the "Persistence of Nature" photography exhibition at Exposure Gallery upstairs. 

Happy Easter!

6ottarts,

Ottawa Art Scene: April 10 - 16

Tonight, Montreal artist Kai McCall has a solo show opening at Galerie St. Laurent + Hall in the Market. Check out his painted portraits of people in imaginary scenarios - from gun-toting revolutionaries on motorcycles to bespectacled young men in the woods.

On Friday night, La Petite Mort has a special exhibition for us called “UP / DOWN / CHARM / STRANGE / TOP / BOTTOM”, a group exhibition of works by artists from the Mexico City-based collective, La Trampa Gráfica Contemporánea. One of the artists was included in last summer’s Sakahan exhibition at the NGC, and now returns to Ottawa for this group exhibition.

This weekend, you can check out two new art exhibitions at the War Museum that present artistic representations of world wars. Witness: Canadian Art of the First World War is a group exhibition by artists like AY Jackson and Frederick Varley. I’m particularly interested in seeing sketches done in the trenches and POW camps. The other exhibition, Transformations: AY Jackson and Otto Dix, shows the impact that the war had on these two artists (one Canadian and one German) in their later work. 

To complete your weekend of art, Westboro’s Cube Gallery has organized the exhibition 3 by 3: Cowen, Thauberger, and Yuristy, featuring panorama paintings by three esteemed Canadian artists, Jack Cowin, David Thauberger and Russell Yuristy. The official vernssage is on Sunday, so spend your day walking down Wellington and pop by!

6ottarts,

Ottawa Art Scene: April 4 - 9

Last week, I recommended the Rodin/Claudel ballet at the NAC, and this week, the creative couple comes up again, as the Carleton Film Department will be showing Camille Claudel 1915 tonight as part of their new film festival. It’s a fantastic line-up (and free!), so be sure to check out some of the screenings.

All weekend, the Carleton Fieldhouse will be taken over by the Ottawa Antique Show. Tons of amazing pieces - including art - to buy (or more likely, browse). Carleton students, staff, and faculty get in for free so take advantage!

Have you been to visit Gallery 101’s new space in Little Italy? Their new exhibition, Turning the Page, celebrates the next step in the artist-run centre’s history, and includes a bunch of cool events this month.

And don’t forget to come to CUAG’s last DOUBLE MAJOR of the season. One of our featured speakers, Ainsley Walton, will be talking about her job as a new media art conservator at the National Gallery of Canada. Should be really fascinating!

6ottarts,

Upcoming event at CUAG: DOUBLE MAJOR// April Edition: New Media Art Conservation + Introverts

This is a great graphic from Buzzfeed that maps an introvert’s brain. Want to learn more? Join us next Tuesday for our last DOUBLE MAJOR of the season: “New Media Art Conservation + Introverts”. Carleton Psychology professor John Zelenski will be sharing his research on happiness and the introvert brain.

6ottarts, medium,

Ottawa Art Scene: March 27 - April 2

Tonight is the opening reception for the exhibition honouring all the 2014 recipients of the Canada Council Governor-General Awards in Visual and Media Arts. Head to the National Gallery of Canada for some wine, fancy cheese, and have a look at some incredible work by the honorees, including Ottawa artist Carol Wainio and beloved NGC curator Brydon Smith.

Though technically not a visual art event, the NAC is hosting Les Grands Ballets Canadiens de Montreal production of Rodin/Claudel, the story of sculptor Auguste Rodin and his lover, studio assistant, muse (and sculptor in her own right), Camille Claudel. Performances are happening tonight, tomorrow, and Saturday night, and there are Live Rush tickets available for students, so take advantage!

GuerillaCRAWL continues this week, with a few more events to celebrate their 10th Anniversary publication. On Friday night, SPAO’s annual Print Sale is happening, where you can get prints by great local photographers like Rémi Thériault and Whitney Lewis-Smith, as well as a special portfolio of beautiful photographs by Franz Rosenbaum, who was known for his portraits of jazz musicians.

Then, on Saturday night, the official launch of Guerilla Mag’s special edition publication will take place at Gallery 101’s new location. A big celebration of Ottawa creativity, the night will feature tons of music and performances. Also pizza.

Arts Court once again plays host to Art Battle - Ottawa on Saturday night, where local artists participate in a live painting competition, with the audience deciding the winner by vote. These events are super popular and should be a really exciting night! Also - student discount!

6ottarts,

Ottawa Art Scene: March 20 - 26

Tonight marks the launch of Guerilla Magazine’s week-long GuerillaCRAWL, in support of the magazine’s 10th anniversary edition. Check out tons of art, media, and cultural events this week, starting at Patrick Mikhail Gallery with the art exhibition "K-14", street photography by Jonathan Lorange. Throughout the week there will be vernissages, art parties, film screenings, and more! A great way to celebrate creativity in the city.

Also tonight, Christopher Rhode, the programmer at SAW Video, has curated an evening of Dennis Tourbin’s video works, ABCDelevision: The Videos of Dennis Tourbin, in conjunction with CUAG’s exhibition Dennis Tourbin: The Language of Visual Poetry. The screening is happening at Club SAW, so head downtown to explore this other aspect of Tourbin’s artistic practice.

Speaking of supporting the art community in Ottawa, on Friday evening, the University of Ottawa B.F.A. graduating class has organized an auction at Club SAW to raise money for their upcoming final exhibition. If you’re on the look-out for young artists and looking to expand (or start) your art collection, this is a great place to start! 

On Tuesday evening, the Ottawa Public Library has invited Carleton U. Art History professor Carol Payne to give a talk on the National Film Board’s photography collection, discussing in from the perspective of nation-building in the mid-twentieth century.

Have a good week!

6ottarts, Dennis Tourbin,

Ottawa Art Scene: March 13 - 19

For your weekly dose of art, there are a few vernissages to check out over the next couple of days, on both sides of the frozen river. Why let this #EndlessWinter get in our way?

Tonight, Voix Visuelle presents two new exhibitions, Weather and Vide?, which explore time and the environment. The former is a series of photographs taken by Andrzej Maciejewskiwith a homemade walk-in Camera Obscura, while Stephanie Morrissette’s photographs and video works focus on the Gaspe region, where she documented the decline of the fishing industry and the human strain on the environment.

For Friday night, you can head to La Petite Mort for the sure-to-be-packed opening at La Petite Mort ofMAIM: New Paintings by Gill King, whichexplore the idea of animals as objects, paradoxically representing nightmarish imagery like industrial farming through beautiful abstractions on the canvases. The stick n’ poke tattoos are back, as well as a special performance by contemporary dancer Kaja Irwin.

There’s a wonderful new Charles Edenshaw exhibition at the National Gallery of Canada, showcasing carvings and silverwork by the acclaimed 19th-century Haida artist. Keep an eye out for the intricate walking cane handles carved from ivory and beautiful wooden boxes.

If you’re downtown at lunch on Wednesday, there will be a talk at the Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada Art Gallery with Michelle McGeough, who curated their current exhibition Beyond Recognition: Aboriginal Abstraction.

Also on Wednesday, head to the Ottawa Art Gallery Sales + Rental for a Q&A with Ottawa-based artist Colin White, who self-publishes comics, makes art and freelances as an illustrator and graphic designer. You have probably seen his series of illustrations of local streetscapes (here’s my personal favourite) around town. The talk begins at 6 p.m.

Have a good weekend!

6ottarts,

Ottawa Art Scene: February 27 - March 5

It’s looking like a busy week here at CUAG…we’ve got THREE events coming up! There’s lots of other great art stuff happening around the city too.

Tonight, head to the National Gallery of Canada for a drawing workshop in their new John Ruskin exhibition space. For inspiration, Check out this article in their magazine on the British artist’s watercolours.

Tomorrow (Friday) evening, come to CUAG for an Art Picnic, where we’ll be serving up spoken word, acoustic performances, a zine exchange (plus all the materials to make your own), and button-making! All the activities are inspired by our winter exhibitions, so you can walk around and check out the art as well! Don’t forget to bring something for the potluck!

On Saturday, if you’re in the mood to make some art, the Ottawa Art Gallery has organized an embroidery workshop in conjunction with David R. Harper’s exhibition. Canadian artist Kate Jackson will be leading the workshop, talking about her own practice and demonstrating how to draw with embroidery! Looks fantastic, plus it’s free! Registration is required.

On Monday evening, we’re thrilled to be presenting a panel discussion about the life, work, and legacy of artist, activist, and poet Dennis Tourbin. Diana Nemiroff will be moderating the conversation between journalism professor Christopher Dornan, curator/art historian Judith Parker, and artist/curator Daniel Sharp.

Finally, on Wednesday afternoon, CUAG is hosting a lecture by renowned Concordia Art History professor Cynthia Hammond, who will be speaking on “Making Space: Activism, Landscape, and Women’s History”. Join us at 4 p.m. if you’re on campus!

6ottarts,


Being a born and bred Winnipegger, I am used to very tight knit, collaborative communities. After moving to Ottawa from Montreal last spring I wasn’t expecting to feel such a connection to the City but within a few months of living here I felt like I belonged. Ottawa’s burgeoning art community allows for individuals to have a big impact and to be able to play a large role in shaping it. Being smaller than cities like Toronto and Montreal also has its perks because it’s easier to bump into people at shows, resulting in stronger relationships and opportunities for collaboration. In a larger city there are often endless openings you can attend every night of the week. This can take a toll on studio time so it’s nice to be in a quieter city where you can buckle down with less distractions. 
-painter Gillian King

Newly local painter Gillian King talks about the benefits of being an artist in a smaller city like Ottawa - all excellent points!
What do you like about Ottawa’s art scene?
p.s. This Good Things Ottawa blog is awesome!
ZoomInfo

Being a born and bred Winnipegger, I am used to very tight knit, collaborative communities. After moving to Ottawa from Montreal last spring I wasn’t expecting to feel such a connection to the City but within a few months of living here I felt like I belonged. Ottawa’s burgeoning art community allows for individuals to have a big impact and to be able to play a large role in shaping it. Being smaller than cities like Toronto and Montreal also has its perks because it’s easier to bump into people at shows, resulting in stronger relationships and opportunities for collaboration. In a larger city there are often endless openings you can attend every night of the week. This can take a toll on studio time so it’s nice to be in a quieter city where you can buckle down with less distractions. 
-painter Gillian King

Newly local painter Gillian King talks about the benefits of being an artist in a smaller city like Ottawa - all excellent points!
What do you like about Ottawa’s art scene?
p.s. This Good Things Ottawa blog is awesome!
ZoomInfo

Being a born and bred Winnipegger, I am used to very tight knit, collaborative communities. After moving to Ottawa from Montreal last spring I wasn’t expecting to feel such a connection to the City but within a few months of living here I felt like I belonged. Ottawa’s burgeoning art community allows for individuals to have a big impact and to be able to play a large role in shaping it. Being smaller than cities like Toronto and Montreal also has its perks because it’s easier to bump into people at shows, resulting in stronger relationships and opportunities for collaboration. In a larger city there are often endless openings you can attend every night of the week. This can take a toll on studio time so it’s nice to be in a quieter city where you can buckle down with less distractions. 
-painter Gillian King

Newly local painter Gillian King talks about the benefits of being an artist in a smaller city like Ottawa - all excellent points!
What do you like about Ottawa’s art scene?
p.s. This Good Things Ottawa blog is awesome!
ZoomInfo

Being a born and bred Winnipegger, I am used to very tight knit, collaborative communities. After moving to Ottawa from Montreal last spring I wasn’t expecting to feel such a connection to the City but within a few months of living here I felt like I belonged. Ottawa’s burgeoning art community allows for individuals to have a big impact and to be able to play a large role in shaping it. Being smaller than cities like Toronto and Montreal also has its perks because it’s easier to bump into people at shows, resulting in stronger relationships and opportunities for collaboration. In a larger city there are often endless openings you can attend every night of the week. This can take a toll on studio time so it’s nice to be in a quieter city where you can buckle down with less distractions. 
-painter Gillian King

Newly local painter Gillian King talks about the benefits of being an artist in a smaller city like Ottawa - all excellent points!
What do you like about Ottawa’s art scene?
p.s. This Good Things Ottawa blog is awesome!
ZoomInfo

Being a born and bred Winnipegger, I am used to very tight knit, collaborative communities. After moving to Ottawa from Montreal last spring I wasn’t expecting to feel such a connection to the City but within a few months of living here I felt like I belonged. Ottawa’s burgeoning art community allows for individuals to have a big impact and to be able to play a large role in shaping it. Being smaller than cities like Toronto and Montreal also has its perks because it’s easier to bump into people at shows, resulting in stronger relationships and opportunities for collaboration. In a larger city there are often endless openings you can attend every night of the week. This can take a toll on studio time so it’s nice to be in a quieter city where you can buckle down with less distractions. 
-painter Gillian King

Newly local painter Gillian King talks about the benefits of being an artist in a smaller city like Ottawa - all excellent points!
What do you like about Ottawa’s art scene?
p.s. This Good Things Ottawa blog is awesome!
ZoomInfo

Being a born and bred Winnipegger, I am used to very tight knit, collaborative communities. After moving to Ottawa from Montreal last spring I wasn’t expecting to feel such a connection to the City but within a few months of living here I felt like I belonged. Ottawa’s burgeoning art community allows for individuals to have a big impact and to be able to play a large role in shaping it. Being smaller than cities like Toronto and Montreal also has its perks because it’s easier to bump into people at shows, resulting in stronger relationships and opportunities for collaboration. In a larger city there are often endless openings you can attend every night of the week. This can take a toll on studio time so it’s nice to be in a quieter city where you can buckle down with less distractions. 
-painter Gillian King

Newly local painter Gillian King talks about the benefits of being an artist in a smaller city like Ottawa - all excellent points!
What do you like about Ottawa’s art scene?
p.s. This Good Things Ottawa blog is awesome!
ZoomInfo

Being a born and bred Winnipegger, I am used to very tight knit, collaborative communities. After moving to Ottawa from Montreal last spring I wasn’t expecting to feel such a connection to the City but within a few months of living here I felt like I belonged. Ottawa’s burgeoning art community allows for individuals to have a big impact and to be able to play a large role in shaping it. Being smaller than cities like Toronto and Montreal also has its perks because it’s easier to bump into people at shows, resulting in stronger relationships and opportunities for collaboration. In a larger city there are often endless openings you can attend every night of the week. This can take a toll on studio time so it’s nice to be in a quieter city where you can buckle down with less distractions. 
-painter Gillian King

Newly local painter Gillian King talks about the benefits of being an artist in a smaller city like Ottawa - all excellent points!
What do you like about Ottawa’s art scene?
p.s. This Good Things Ottawa blog is awesome!
ZoomInfo

Being a born and bred Winnipegger, I am used to very tight knit, collaborative communities. After moving to Ottawa from Montreal last spring I wasn’t expecting to feel such a connection to the City but within a few months of living here I felt like I belonged. Ottawa’s burgeoning art community allows for individuals to have a big impact and to be able to play a large role in shaping it. Being smaller than cities like Toronto and Montreal also has its perks because it’s easier to bump into people at shows, resulting in stronger relationships and opportunities for collaboration. In a larger city there are often endless openings you can attend every night of the week. This can take a toll on studio time so it’s nice to be in a quieter city where you can buckle down with less distractions. 
-painter Gillian King

Newly local painter Gillian King talks about the benefits of being an artist in a smaller city like Ottawa - all excellent points!
What do you like about Ottawa’s art scene?
p.s. This Good Things Ottawa blog is awesome!
ZoomInfo

Being a born and bred Winnipegger, I am used to very tight knit, collaborative communities. After moving to Ottawa from Montreal last spring I wasn’t expecting to feel such a connection to the City but within a few months of living here I felt like I belonged. Ottawa’s burgeoning art community allows for individuals to have a big impact and to be able to play a large role in shaping it. Being smaller than cities like Toronto and Montreal also has its perks because it’s easier to bump into people at shows, resulting in stronger relationships and opportunities for collaboration. In a larger city there are often endless openings you can attend every night of the week. This can take a toll on studio time so it’s nice to be in a quieter city where you can buckle down with less distractions. 

-painter Gillian King

Newly local painter Gillian King talks about the benefits of being an artist in a smaller city like Ottawa - all excellent points!

What do you like about Ottawa’s art scene?

p.s. This Good Things Ottawa blog is awesome!

Source: goodthingsottawa

6ottarts,

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