Posts tagged ottawa

Happy St. Patrick’s Day! 
Today is the last day to see Live Through This: Photographs by Tony Fouhse. We’re open ‘til 5pm tonight, so stop by before you head out to celebrate all things green.
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Nikon D3x
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Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

Today is the last day to see Live Through This: Photographs by Tony Fouhse. We’re open ‘til 5pm tonight, so stop by before you head out to celebrate all things green.

6St. Patrick's Day, ottawa, Tony Fouhse,

Collection Friday! for the Superbowl Weekend.

Catherine Wild, Hairy Mystic Football, 1994.

Lithograph on paper. Gift of Gary Bomza, 1997.

6collection friday, cuag, ottawa, superbowl,

Tony Fouhse will be in the gallery next Monday, February 4th at 7pm to talk about his project, “Live Through This.” Join us!
https://www.facebook.com/events/150393495110238/
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Nikon D3x
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100
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Tony Fouhse will be in the gallery next Monday, February 4th at 7pm to talk about his project, “Live Through This.” Join us!

https://www.facebook.com/events/150393495110238/

6tony fouhse, live through this, CUAG, ottawa, ottarts,

Collection Friday!
How’s everyone doing with their “healthy eating” New Year’s Resolution? Here’s some inspiration from Ottawa photographer Justin Wonnacott to eat fresh fish! (And some recipes to get you going.)
Justin Wonnacott, There are more carp raised for food thanany other fish, and no two look alike, from the series I Remember and I Forget, 2010. Inkjet on paper.
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Canon EOS 30D
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Collection Friday!

How’s everyone doing with their “healthy eating” New Year’s Resolution? Here’s some inspiration from Ottawa photographer Justin Wonnacott to eat fresh fish! (And some recipes to get you going.)

Justin Wonnacott, There are more carp raised for food thanany other fish, and no two look alike, from the series I Remember and I Forget, 2010. Inkjet on paper.

6collection friday, fish, photography, ottarts, ottawa, Carleton University, New Years Resolutions,

CONTEST! CATS! OH MY!
Time is running out to see Photomontage Between the Wars! It closes on Sunday, December 16th.
Stop by in the next two weeks, snap a picture of your favourite detail from any of the incredible works on display, send it to us on Twitter (@CUArtGallery) by December 16th and you could WIN the beautiful exhibition catalogue!
p.s. This one is the favourite of our Assistant Curator/Registrar/Collections Manager, Patrick Côté. It’s a detail from Nikolai Sidel’nikov’s Maquette for book cover [Who Wins from War], 1932. Collage: photogravure, gouache, ink, and coloured paper on paper.
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iPhone 4
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CONTEST! CATS! OH MY!

Time is running out to see Photomontage Between the Wars! It closes on Sunday, December 16th.

Stop by in the next two weeks, snap a picture of your favourite detail from any of the incredible works on display, send it to us on Twitter (@CUArtGallery) by December 16th and you could WIN the beautiful exhibition catalogue!

p.s. This one is the favourite of our Assistant Curator/Registrar/Collections Manager, Patrick Côté. It’s a detail from Nikolai Sidel’nikov’s Maquette for book cover [Who Wins from War], 1932. Collage: photogravure, gouache, ink, and coloured paper on paper.

6cats, photomontage, ottawa, CUAG,

Collection Friday! #MuseumOlympics
Mark Emerek, Summer Fishing/Aoyami Ikalukhioktok, from the Kalvak/Emerak Memorial Portfolio, 1987.
Stonecut on paper, Gift of Drew and Carolle Anne Armour, 2009.
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Canon EOS 30D
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Collection Friday! #MuseumOlympics

Mark Emerek, Summer Fishing/Aoyami Ikalukhioktok, from the Kalvak/Emerak Memorial Portfolio, 1987.

Stonecut on paper, Gift of Drew and Carolle Anne Armour, 2009.

6MuseumOlympics, Inuit art, art, CUAG, ottawa,

Collection Friday!

Mark Marsters (Canadian, 1962-2002), The Lick and Look Camel of Thunder Bay, 1993.

Acrylic on paper. Gift of Scott Warwick, 2006.

This painting is featured in our current exhibition, An Embarrassment of Riches: The Collection in Focus.

It belongs to a series of narrative paintings by Mark Marsters entitled Following Richard Roe, which features the fictional character Roe, who is pictured at the centre of this composition. Marsters traveled across western Canada in 1993, gathering information about ordinary people – what they did, where they lived. He then created the character of Roe, who, he said, “according to the stories I have been told, is a very strange man.”

In the story that accompanies this work, Marsters wrote how Roe assembled a camel from dumpster junk to tell the fortunes of people on the streets of Thunder Bay for a $5.00 fee. Roe’s “camel” features a head made from an old wood basket, a tongue made from a baseball glove, and a body made from scraps of canvas and fabric.

Roe would perch beneath the camel, have its “tongue” lick his client’s hand, and make up some nonsense about their future. Exposed as a scam artist, Roe is finally chased to the bus station to escape Thunder Bay. Marsters depicts Roe in full flight, the camel contraption askew as he careers down the street. Dogs bark, garbage is scattered, bystanders cry out, a child is in tears.

6collection friday, carleton university art gallery, ottawa, ottarts, mark marsters,

Ottawa Art Scene: June 14 - 20

On Friday night, Wurm Gallery (aka Invisible Cinema) is presenting the work of Danica Olders in in a show called “People on the Side: New Work by Danica A. Olders.” She’s a recent NSCAD grad (good cred) and fibre artist. Check out her Tumblog for some sneak peeks into the work that will be in the show, including small oddball drawings and embroidery. I particularly enjoy this little guy (boy scout)? People on the Side: New Work by Danica A. Olders, Wurm Gallery (Invisible Cinema, 319 Lisgar St.), Friday, June 15, 8-11pm, FREE.

Over at SAW Gallery, there’s a group show of Punk photography in Ottawa called “Vacant Stares,” documenting the alternative punk scene that’s been in this city for three decades. The title of the show refers to all those soulless government employees that call Ottawa home, courtesy of Canadian punk band ‘The Red Squares.’ Featured photographers include David Forcier and Nick Shaw. This show is on for a couple weeks, so drop by when you’re downtown. Vacant Stares: Ottawa Punk Photography Spanning Three Decades, SAW Gallery (67 Nicholas St.), until June 23rd, FREE.

If you’re in the mood for photography, Greg Zenha, the artist-in-residence over at School of Photographic Arts: Ottawa, will be giving an artist talk on Saturday afternoon at the Red Wall Gallery. His work on view, “I said house not home,” is a visual manifestation of the process of self analysis he had experienced recently. Greg Zenha Artist Talk, Red Wall Gallery (168 Dalhousie), Saturday, June 16, 2pm., FREE.

Your weekly requisite art party comes to you from Patrick John Mills Gallery, who will be throwing a (open bar!) party as part of the titillatingly titled current show “Naked Naked Naked.” There is a LOT going down at this party: live nude model drawing, a drumming circle, poetry readings, burlesque courtesy of Sin Sisters, live painting, and a heck of a lot more, I’m sure. Should be cray. Let’s Get Naked, Patrick John Mills Gallery (286 Hinchley Ave.), Saturday, June 16, 5pm - whenever, $20.

6ottarts, art party, ottawa,

A couple weeks ago, some of the staff of CUAG (Diana Nemiroff, Sandra Dyck, Patrick Lacasse, and myself) traveled underground to the @Carleton_U Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism to be part of a panel for the 2nd year Studio classes of John Cook, Eric Archambault, Renee Hynes, and Matt Edwards. We were also joined by Sarah Gelbard, who had been an instructor at the School as well.
The students had been given the assignment of designing an addition for CUAG, one that would raise the profile of the gallery on campus. The new space also had to include a room for video projections and a “rough-and-ready” project space that would provide more flexibility for large installations. 
Each student was asked to present their proposal, and then we would provide feedback, comments, and suggestions. It was a really great experience: very fun but challenging. I loved hearing what the architecture instructors had to say about design, and we learned new vocab like “skin” and “exploded axonometric view.” We brought up issues that were specific to museum design, such as the use of natural light, the need for communal space, and how the new space related to the original gallery.
I took some photos during the two afternoons we were there, so that I could share this great experience. Students: if you were there, let me know who you are via Twitter (@CUArtGallery)! I’ll put captions!
ZoomInfo
A couple weeks ago, some of the staff of CUAG (Diana Nemiroff, Sandra Dyck, Patrick Lacasse, and myself) traveled underground to the @Carleton_U Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism to be part of a panel for the 2nd year Studio classes of John Cook, Eric Archambault, Renee Hynes, and Matt Edwards. We were also joined by Sarah Gelbard, who had been an instructor at the School as well.
The students had been given the assignment of designing an addition for CUAG, one that would raise the profile of the gallery on campus. The new space also had to include a room for video projections and a “rough-and-ready” project space that would provide more flexibility for large installations. 
Each student was asked to present their proposal, and then we would provide feedback, comments, and suggestions. It was a really great experience: very fun but challenging. I loved hearing what the architecture instructors had to say about design, and we learned new vocab like “skin” and “exploded axonometric view.” We brought up issues that were specific to museum design, such as the use of natural light, the need for communal space, and how the new space related to the original gallery.
I took some photos during the two afternoons we were there, so that I could share this great experience. Students: if you were there, let me know who you are via Twitter (@CUArtGallery)! I’ll put captions!
ZoomInfo
A couple weeks ago, some of the staff of CUAG (Diana Nemiroff, Sandra Dyck, Patrick Lacasse, and myself) traveled underground to the @Carleton_U Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism to be part of a panel for the 2nd year Studio classes of John Cook, Eric Archambault, Renee Hynes, and Matt Edwards. We were also joined by Sarah Gelbard, who had been an instructor at the School as well.
The students had been given the assignment of designing an addition for CUAG, one that would raise the profile of the gallery on campus. The new space also had to include a room for video projections and a “rough-and-ready” project space that would provide more flexibility for large installations. 
Each student was asked to present their proposal, and then we would provide feedback, comments, and suggestions. It was a really great experience: very fun but challenging. I loved hearing what the architecture instructors had to say about design, and we learned new vocab like “skin” and “exploded axonometric view.” We brought up issues that were specific to museum design, such as the use of natural light, the need for communal space, and how the new space related to the original gallery.
I took some photos during the two afternoons we were there, so that I could share this great experience. Students: if you were there, let me know who you are via Twitter (@CUArtGallery)! I’ll put captions!
ZoomInfo
A couple weeks ago, some of the staff of CUAG (Diana Nemiroff, Sandra Dyck, Patrick Lacasse, and myself) traveled underground to the @Carleton_U Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism to be part of a panel for the 2nd year Studio classes of John Cook, Eric Archambault, Renee Hynes, and Matt Edwards. We were also joined by Sarah Gelbard, who had been an instructor at the School as well.
The students had been given the assignment of designing an addition for CUAG, one that would raise the profile of the gallery on campus. The new space also had to include a room for video projections and a “rough-and-ready” project space that would provide more flexibility for large installations. 
Each student was asked to present their proposal, and then we would provide feedback, comments, and suggestions. It was a really great experience: very fun but challenging. I loved hearing what the architecture instructors had to say about design, and we learned new vocab like “skin” and “exploded axonometric view.” We brought up issues that were specific to museum design, such as the use of natural light, the need for communal space, and how the new space related to the original gallery.
I took some photos during the two afternoons we were there, so that I could share this great experience. Students: if you were there, let me know who you are via Twitter (@CUArtGallery)! I’ll put captions!
ZoomInfo
A couple weeks ago, some of the staff of CUAG (Diana Nemiroff, Sandra Dyck, Patrick Lacasse, and myself) traveled underground to the @Carleton_U Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism to be part of a panel for the 2nd year Studio classes of John Cook, Eric Archambault, Renee Hynes, and Matt Edwards. We were also joined by Sarah Gelbard, who had been an instructor at the School as well.
The students had been given the assignment of designing an addition for CUAG, one that would raise the profile of the gallery on campus. The new space also had to include a room for video projections and a “rough-and-ready” project space that would provide more flexibility for large installations. 
Each student was asked to present their proposal, and then we would provide feedback, comments, and suggestions. It was a really great experience: very fun but challenging. I loved hearing what the architecture instructors had to say about design, and we learned new vocab like “skin” and “exploded axonometric view.” We brought up issues that were specific to museum design, such as the use of natural light, the need for communal space, and how the new space related to the original gallery.
I took some photos during the two afternoons we were there, so that I could share this great experience. Students: if you were there, let me know who you are via Twitter (@CUArtGallery)! I’ll put captions!
ZoomInfo
A couple weeks ago, some of the staff of CUAG (Diana Nemiroff, Sandra Dyck, Patrick Lacasse, and myself) traveled underground to the @Carleton_U Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism to be part of a panel for the 2nd year Studio classes of John Cook, Eric Archambault, Renee Hynes, and Matt Edwards. We were also joined by Sarah Gelbard, who had been an instructor at the School as well.
The students had been given the assignment of designing an addition for CUAG, one that would raise the profile of the gallery on campus. The new space also had to include a room for video projections and a “rough-and-ready” project space that would provide more flexibility for large installations. 
Each student was asked to present their proposal, and then we would provide feedback, comments, and suggestions. It was a really great experience: very fun but challenging. I loved hearing what the architecture instructors had to say about design, and we learned new vocab like “skin” and “exploded axonometric view.” We brought up issues that were specific to museum design, such as the use of natural light, the need for communal space, and how the new space related to the original gallery.
I took some photos during the two afternoons we were there, so that I could share this great experience. Students: if you were there, let me know who you are via Twitter (@CUArtGallery)! I’ll put captions!
ZoomInfo
A couple weeks ago, some of the staff of CUAG (Diana Nemiroff, Sandra Dyck, Patrick Lacasse, and myself) traveled underground to the @Carleton_U Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism to be part of a panel for the 2nd year Studio classes of John Cook, Eric Archambault, Renee Hynes, and Matt Edwards. We were also joined by Sarah Gelbard, who had been an instructor at the School as well.
The students had been given the assignment of designing an addition for CUAG, one that would raise the profile of the gallery on campus. The new space also had to include a room for video projections and a “rough-and-ready” project space that would provide more flexibility for large installations. 
Each student was asked to present their proposal, and then we would provide feedback, comments, and suggestions. It was a really great experience: very fun but challenging. I loved hearing what the architecture instructors had to say about design, and we learned new vocab like “skin” and “exploded axonometric view.” We brought up issues that were specific to museum design, such as the use of natural light, the need for communal space, and how the new space related to the original gallery.
I took some photos during the two afternoons we were there, so that I could share this great experience. Students: if you were there, let me know who you are via Twitter (@CUArtGallery)! I’ll put captions!
ZoomInfo

A couple weeks ago, some of the staff of CUAG (Diana Nemiroff, Sandra Dyck, Patrick Lacasse, and myself) traveled underground to the @Carleton_U Azrieli School of Architecture and Urbanism to be part of a panel for the 2nd year Studio classes of John Cook, Eric Archambault, Renee Hynes, and Matt Edwards. We were also joined by Sarah Gelbard, who had been an instructor at the School as well.

The students had been given the assignment of designing an addition for CUAG, one that would raise the profile of the gallery on campus. The new space also had to include a room for video projections and a “rough-and-ready” project space that would provide more flexibility for large installations. 

Each student was asked to present their proposal, and then we would provide feedback, comments, and suggestions. It was a really great experience: very fun but challenging. I loved hearing what the architecture instructors had to say about design, and we learned new vocab like “skin” and “exploded axonometric view.” We brought up issues that were specific to museum design, such as the use of natural light, the need for communal space, and how the new space related to the original gallery.

I took some photos during the two afternoons we were there, so that I could share this great experience. Students: if you were there, let me know who you are via Twitter (@CUArtGallery)! I’ll put captions!

6carleton university art gallery, archicture, carleton university, ottawa,

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